Charlie Sheen gives USO 1% of sitcom

Charlie Sheen's "Anger Management" airs Thursday nights on the FX channel.

Story highlights

  • The USO get's 1% of "Anger Management" profits
  • There will be no cap on how much the donation will add up to, the USO says
  • The USO provides U.S. military personnel with "morale, welfare and recreation-type services"

If Charlie Sheen's new sitcom is a hit, America's soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen will benefit because of a donation the actor is making to the USO.

Sitcom Sheen is back with 'Anger Management'

Sheen will give 1% of the profits of "Anger Management," with a guaranteed minimum of $1 million, to the USO, which provides U.S. military personnel "morale, welfare and recreation-type services at hundreds of locations around the world," the group said Monday.

"It's an honor for me to be able to give back to these men and women of the military who have done so much for all of us," Sheen said in a news release. "They put their lives on the line for us every day, and I'm just happy that my work on 'Anger Management' can bring a little bit of relief to the troops and their families."

Sheen created the show, which airs Thursday nights on the FX channel, on the rebound from his dramatic firing last year from the hit CBS sitcom "Two and a Half Men." He was paid a reported $1.2 million an episode for that show.

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There will be no cap on how much the donation will add up to, the USO said.

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Sheen's donation will go toward an ongoing USO campaign called Operation Enduring Care, which supports injured troops and their families, according to Gena Fitzgerald, vice president of communications for the group.

"His support is greatly appreciated, especially from our wounded warriors and their families," said John Pray Jr., the retired Air Force brigadier general who is the USO's executive vice president.

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