By the numbers: Small business

Only 45% of new businesses established in 2004 were still around in 2009.

Story highlights

  • Three small business tax cut bills were rejected by Congress this week
  • $7 million is the largest amount of annual receipts a business can have and still be "small"
  • $87 billion is the potential amount added to the GDP by small business

Senate Republicans on Thursday blocked a Democrat-backed bill that would have extended tax cuts to small businesses.

Both sides indicated the vote was political one -- Democrats said Republicans blocked the bill to cost President Barack Obama political points. Republicans said that the legislation was a campaign stunt and wasn't enough to have any impact on jump-starting the economy.

By the numbers, here's a look at small business in America:

CNN Money: Small Business

3 - Small business tax cut bills that were rejected in the U.S. Congress this week.

1953 - Year the U.S. Small Business Administration was founded.

499 - Highest number of employees a business can have to be considered a "small business."

    249 - Maximum workers employed at a "small business" in the 1950s.

    79 - Percent of American businesses that are non-employee businesses, with no employees other than the proprietor.

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    $7 million - Largest amount of average annual receipts to qualify as a small business.

    20 - Percent of income eligible for tax deduction by small businesses under the Small Business Tax Cut Act, proposed by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor.

    $73 billion - Amount of the projected total increase in personal incomes if the Democrats' Small Business Jobs and Tax Relief Act had passed in the Senate.

    $87 billion - Amount potentially added to the GDP.

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    990,592 - Estimated number of jobs that would have been created.

    10% - Tax credit on new payroll, a hiring incentive for business owners under the Senate Small Business Jobs and Tax Relief Act.

    7 - Shortage of votes needed for the Senate to be able to invoke cloture and end the debate on the bill.

    5,749,797 - Firms in the U.S. with fewer than 500 employees, as of 2009.

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    56,281,503 - Employees of small firms with fewer than 500 workers, in 2009.

    2.4 million - Businesses owned by veterans, making up 9% of all businesses, as of 2007.

    45 - percent of new businesses established in 2004 that were still around in 2009.

    2 - Percent of Americans with incomes higher than $250,000 annually, those who would be affected by the expiration of the Bush-era tax cuts, according to President Obama.

    1 in 6 - Baby boomers surveyed in 2011 by AARP who expect to eventually have their own business.

        Election 2012

      • CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06:  U.S. President Barack Obama stands on stage with first lady Michelle Obama, U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and Dr. Jill Biden after his victory speech on election night at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

        A black man is returning to the White House. Four years ago, it was a first, the breaking of a racial barrier. Tuesday night, it was history redux. And more.
      • CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06:  U.S. President Barack Obama stands on stage after his victory speech at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

        The 2012 presidential election shattered spending records, further polarized a divided country and launched a thousand hashtags.
      • Even though voters indicated to pollsters that their financial situation is the same or worse than it was four years ago, they put their trust in the president.
      • US President Barack Obama addresses a crowd of supporters on stage on election night November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. President Barack Obama swept to re-election Tuesday, forging history again by transcending a slow economic recovery and the high unemployment which haunted his first term to beat Republican Mitt Romney. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

        The president faces a long and familiar set of challenges after riding a wave of support from moderates, women and minorities to victory.
      • Republicans kept a lock on the U.S. House of Representatives, a crucial victory after the party failed to wrest away the presidency from Barack Obama and the Senate from the Democrats.