Euro 2012 final: Can Italy stop Spain's bid for history?

Story highlights

  • Euro 2012 final takes place in Ukrainian capital of Kiev
  • Spain aiming to become the first nation to win 3 successive major tournaments
  • Italy looking for first Euro triumph since 1968
  • Spain's dominance and style has been labeled "boring" by some critics

Sunday's showpiece European Championship final in the Ukrainian capital Kiev pits Spain against Italy, between them the winners of the last two World Cups.

Spain is on the brink of creating soccer history; never before has a country won three major international football tournaments in a row. And Spain, which won Euro 2008 and the 2010 World Cup, now has the chance to earn a place in the record books.

Before the Euros, former Barcelona and England striker Gary Lineker said "La Furia Roja," or the Red Fury as the Spanish national team is called, was just one trophy away from greatness.

"If they won three tournaments in a row, something no other team has done, you would have to put them up there among the all-time greatest teams," said Lineker, who helped England reach the World Cup semifinals in 1990.

Spain reach Euro 2012 final after shootout victory

Vicente del Bosque's side enjoyed huge good fortune in Wednesday's semifinal against Iberian neighbors Portugal, winning 4-2 in a penalty shootout after a 0-0 draw. Cesc Fabregas scuffed the decisive spot-kick as it hit the inside the post and rolled along the goal line before creeping into Rui Patricio's net.

Fabregas' penalty can perhaps be seen as a symbol of Spain's unconvincing performances at Euro 2012 so far, which have left a large proportion of the watching public unsatisfied as the team struggled to break down packed opposition defenses.

Italy advances to Euro 2012 final

    Just Watched

    Italy advances to Euro 2012 final

Italy advances to Euro 2012 final 02:10
PLAY VIDEO
Fans react to Italy's Euro 2012 upset

    Just Watched

    Fans react to Italy's Euro 2012 upset

Fans react to Italy's Euro 2012 upset 01:51
PLAY VIDEO
Schmeichel talks Euro 2012 semifinal

    Just Watched

    Schmeichel talks Euro 2012 semifinal

Schmeichel talks Euro 2012 semifinal 03:05
PLAY VIDEO
Penalties bring pleasure for Spain

    Just Watched

    Penalties bring pleasure for Spain

Penalties bring pleasure for Spain 01:33
PLAY VIDEO

The end of a love affair?

For all their possession (Spain have enjoyed around 67% of the ball in their five matches), there has been frustration that the team has neither moved the ball around quickly enough nor created enough goalscoring chances. Instead, it has worn down the other team by making their players chase shadows before waiting for a mistake.

Whisper it quietly, but some have even labeled Spain's previously much-feted tiki-taka style of play "boring" and claimed it is currently a more defensive tactic than offensive. That argument is perhaps backed up by the fact that Spain has now not conceded a knockout-stage goal in any tournament since the 2006 World Cup, a run of nine matches and a remarkable 900 minutes of action.

Against Italy in the group stage and France in the last eight, Del Bosque even picked a starting 11 without a single striker -- a tactic designed to help Spain keep the ball better and lure the opposing defense out so they could get in behind. It hasn't worked flawlessly, but the team has churned out results regardless.

Beautiful football might be what people demand, but results are what Del Bosque deals in first. Since taking over from previous coach Luis Aragones following Euro 2008, the 61-year-old has led the national team to an incredible 50 wins from 59 matches.

Midfielder Andres Iniesta, who scored the winner in the 2010 World Cup final, says Spain isn't bothered by the "boring" tag. The 27-year-old instead focuses on the positives of the team's possession-based game.

"When a team wants to attack and comes up against an opponent that sits back and tries to close the space and not try to create its own chances, that's not always the football you want to watch," said Iniesta. "It's easy to forget that only a few years ago this style is what changed the story of Spain."

A change in mentality

It is a story that began at Euro 2008 -- and really, truly began with Spain's quarterfinal penalty shootout victory over Italy in Vienna, a match that defender Gerard Pique looks back on as the turning point.

"I think it changed the mentality of the national team," said the Barcelona star. "Before, Spain played to avoid losing -- but afterwards they played to win."

Italy was the World Cup champion at the time and the favorite to go through. The team, however, was missing the suspended Andrea Pirlo, who has been in such glorious form at this tournament.