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Brenton Thwaites swims into fame with 'Blue Lagoon'

By JD Cargill, CNN
updated 4:50 PM EDT, Sat June 16, 2012
Brenton Thwaites co-stars with Indiana Evans in
Brenton Thwaites co-stars with Indiana Evans in "Blue Lagoon: The Awakening."
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Lifetime has re-spun a 1980s tale with "Blue Lagoon: The Awakening"
  • Brenton Thwaites co-stars in the reboot
  • He also co-stars in an upcoming film with Angelina Jolie

(CNN) -- Life is good for actor Brenton Thwaites.

When his new movie, "Blue Lagoon: The Awakening" hits the small screen Saturday, he'll have to watch it from across the pond. Thwaites is in London filming his next project, "Maleficent," opposite Angelina Jolie.

Being introduced to the world audience as a romantic lead in back-to-back projects will undoubtedly bring attention to the 22-year-old Aussie with the quick wit and penchant for dropping F-bombs.

It's an interesting mix for a guy who is shy and has no desire to be a heartthrob. Thwaites recently talked to CNN's JD Cargill about his career, his aversion to fame and why he'd like some quality time with John McEnroe.

JD Cargill: What's your emotional state like right now?

Brenton Thwaites: My emotional state is pure f*****g numbness. It's great, I'm living my dream!

Cargill: Tell me a little bit about this latest remake of "Blue Lagoon." What sort of trouble are you kids getting into in that water?

Thwaites: It's a modern film, you know. It's not nearly as hectic as the last one. There's a lot more controversy and a lot more misty activity in the last one. This one's about two high school kids who go on a humanitarian trip to Trinidad. They get caught in a storm and get stranded on an island. It's their journey surviving on the island. But as the journey goes on, they fall in love.

Cargill: Based on what I've seen, the costuming department had it easy on this one.

Thwaites: Well, kind of, yeah. We're both wearing big jackets and beanies and whatever, and then we get thrown into this humid, tropical climate. As one would do if one was in love with a girl and on an island -- I mean, I'd wear nothing, personally. Unfortunately, Lifetime can't show my big. ...

Cargill: OK, let's leave it at that. But speaking of lifetime, they are all about television for women. Are you prepared after this film to be a heartthrob and mobbed by women at every turn?

Thwaites: No way, I'm going to punch them all out! No, it's very flattering and it's great and it's part of the industry and it's part of my job, but I'm very shy. I haven't had the whole "famous" thing happen to me yet, and I hope I never will. I like to sneak away in the corners and hide a lot.

Cargill: Here's my one dumb question: If you could be stranded on a desert island with anyone dead or alive, who would it be?

Thwaites: I like this question! I'm going to have to ponder it for at least 20 seconds. You know what? It would be John McEnroe because I believe we could make tennis rackets out of the palm trees and play tennis with the coconuts. And he would get so angry, and it would be so entertaining up close. I'd be entertained the whole time. Who else? It'd have to be an attractive girl. My ex-girlfriend. She would be nice to put in there. That would be a nice trio.

Cargill: I noticed you didn't mention Angelina Jolie. Did you like that transition?

Thwaites: Very nice.

Cargill: You're now shooting the new "Sleeping Beauty" movie, "Maleficent" with her.

Thwaites: People want to know all this stuff about Angelina Jolie. She's a massive star in this film and she's such an amazing actress and a great figure in this industry.

But my experience with her and all the other stars in the film is quite normal. We rock out and we rehearse and we talk about the scene and we talk about the characters. Everyone kind of voices their opinion and talks to the director and it's just like any other film. There's no stardom. All that stuff is left at the front door. We're all kind of working together to create this cool film.

Cargill: It might feel normal now, but I can imagine you beat out some pretty famous names to play the prince.

Thwaites: You know, I actually don't know who auditioned for it, and I'd like to keep it that way. It's weird when auditioning for roles, because a lot of my mates go out for the same roles. You don't want to know that you're beating someone to the role. I think that's the wrong attitude to have in this town. No one's better, just different. They were looking for someone who was exactly like me.

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