By the numbers: Long-term unemployment

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Story highlights

  • 27: Minimum number of weeks a person must be without job to be "long-term unemployed"
  • 42.8: Percentage of jobless Americans considered long-term unemployed
  • 40: Percentage of long-term unemployed who blame President Barack Obama
  • 69: Percentage of long-term unemployed who say job loss has not changed political views

President Obama and presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney both spoke about the economy in Ohio on Thursday. The twin moves by the dueling campaigns are a sign of just how important the economy and jobs will be in November's election.

By the numbers, here's a look at long-term unemployment.

27: Minimum number of weeks that a person must be without a job to be considered "long-term unemployed."

CNNMoney.com: Only 1 in 10 long-term unemployed find work

5.4 million: Number of Americans who have been jobless for more than 27 weeks, as of May.

12.7 million: Number of Americans unemployed as of May.

39: Average duration of unemployment, in weeks, as of May.

42.8: Percentage of jobless Americans considered long-term unemployed.

CNNMoney.com: Long-term unemployment crisis rolls on

21: Percentage of unemployed people under 25 who had been jobless for more than a year, at the end of 2011.

42: Percentage of unemployed people over 55 who had been jobless over a year, at the end of 2011.

63.6: Percentage of Americans counted as part of the labor force in April, the lowest rate since 1981.

Unemployment takes tough mental toll

71: Percentage of long-term unemployed who blame Wall Street institutions for the country's employment situation.

40: Percentage of long-term unemployed who blame President Barack Obama.

69: Percentage of long-term unemployed who say their job loss has not changed their political views.

Photos: A day in the life of America's long-term unemployed

1.2 million: Highest number of long-term unemployed during the presidency of Jimmy Carter (from January 1981, 14.7% of the total unemployed).

2.8 million: Highest number of long-term unemployed during the presidency of Ronald Reagan (from June 1983, 24.6% of the total unemployed).

2.1 million: Highest number of long-term unemployed during the presidency of George H. W. Bush (from October 1992, 22% of the total unemployed).

1.9 million: Highest number of long-term unemployed during the presidency of Bill Clinton (from January 1993, 20.1% of the total unemployed).

2.6 million: Highest number of long-term unemployed during the presidency of George W. Bush (from December 2008, 22.8% of the total unemployed).

6.7 million: Highest number of long-term unemployed during the presidency of Barack Obama (from April 2010, 48.1% of the total unemployed).

Long-term unemployment worldwide

41: Percentage of unemployed workers in France considered "long-term unemployed" as of 2011.

48: Percentage of unemployed workers in Germany considered "long-term unemployed" as of 2011.

49.6: Percentage of unemployed workers in Greece considered "long-term unemployed" as of 2011.

59.4: Percentage of unemployed workers in Ireland considered "long-term unemployed" as of 2011.

41.6: Percentage of unemployed workers in Spain considered "long-term unemployed" as of 2011.