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Goal-line technology to be tested during England friendly

updated 12:25 PM EDT, Thu May 24, 2012
England were aggrieved after this shot from Frank Lampard against Germany in the 2010 World Cup was not awarded
England were aggrieved after this shot from Frank Lampard against Germany in the 2010 World Cup was not awarded
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • FIFA to trial goal-line technology during England's friendly with Belgium at Wembley
  • Hawk-Eye technology won't be available for match officials during the Euro 2012 warm up
  • If the tests prove successful goal-line technology could be ratified in early July
  • English Premier League chairman has suggested it could be introduced mid-season

(CNN) -- It was the scene for one of the most famous controversies in soccer history. Did England striker Geoff Hurst's shot during the 1966 World Cup final at Wembley cross the line?

The Russian who was running the line that day thought so and his decision helped England to a 4-2 win over West Germany -- their only major tournament success to date.

Forty-six years later, the same London stadium will provide the setting for a major test of pioneering goal-line technology (GLT), that could revolutionize the game of football forever.

British firm "Hawk-eye" employ a series of cameras mounted inside the goal frame and their approach will be tested during England's Euro 2012 warm-up match with Belgium, though none of the information will be available to the match officials.

Goal-line technology enters final testing

Scientists and FIFA officials will analyze the results and if they prove successful, the technology could be ratified at a meeting of the International Football Association Board (IFAB) in early July.

The experiment in front of an estimated crowd of 90,000 at Wembley follows the first Hawk-eye trial at a non-league English cup match earlier this month. An alternative system, designed by German company "GoalRef" is also in the final stages of testing.

Such tests .. could lead to the IFAB approving the introduction of goal-line technology at its special meeting at the beginning of July
FIFA statement

It is somewhat ironic the technology is to be examined during an England match as the team were on the wrong end of a refereeing decision at the 2010 World Cup.

Frank Lampard's shot was disallowed during a second round match with Germany despite replays showing the ball was a full yard over the goal-line.

That incident in South Africa prompted FIFA to overturn their long-held stance on goal-line technology and begin trials.

A statement on FIFA's website said: "Only the EMPA observers, IFAB and FIFA representatives at Wembley will have access to the GLT system readings.

"Therefore, should a goal-line incident occur at this or any of the 'test' matches, the system will not be utilized by the match officials. It means the GLT system will have no influence on the outcome of the matches in which the system is being tested.

"Such tests, along with those being conducted for the GoalRef system in Denmark, could lead to the International Football Association Board approving the introduction of GLT at its special meeting at the beginning of July."

There have been several contentious incidents in the last English season that has renewed calls for the technology to be introduced.

Chelsea were awarded a goal in an FA Cup semifinal against Tottenham at Wembley that was shown not to have crossed the line, while Queens Park Rangers defender Clint Hill's header against Bolton wasn't given despite being well over the line.

English Premier League chairman Richard Scudamore has said he is keen to introduce the technology next season if it is rubber-stamped by FIFA.

FIFA have also confirmed that referees are to be drug tested to check they are not taking performance enhancing substances.

At a meeting of the world governing body's executive committee, chief medical officer Jiri Dvorak said match officials should be subject to the same tests as players.

"We have to consider referees as part of the game," he was quoted as saying by the UK Press Association.

"We have started to discuss this and this is something for the future which will be discussed to include possibly an anti-doping program for referees.

"We do not have an indication that this is a problem but this is something we have to look at. The referees are a neglected population."

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