Photos: Japan tsunami debris reaches Alaska

It's been more than a year since a massive quake devastated northeast Japan, and the debris believed to be from that disaster is now washing up more than 4,000 miles away in Alaska. The Styrofoam that's washing up breaks into little pieces and the wildlife, thinking it is food, will eat it -- causing a negative chain reaction. "The little fish are going to eat some of this stuff and not get the nutrition they need," explained Bill Lucey of the Yakutat Salmon Board. "So they're not going to grow that fast, so they're either going to die or get eaten by predators more readily or they just won't be able to compete in the natural world as well."

It's been more than a year since a massive quake devastated northeast Japan, and the debris believed to be from that disaster is now washing up more than 4,000 miles away in Alaska. The Styrofoam that's washing up breaks into little pieces and the wildlife, thinking it is food, will eat it -- causing a negative chain reaction. "The little fish are going to eat some of this stuff and not get the nutrition they need," explained Bill Lucey of the Yakutat Salmon Board. "So they're not going to grow that fast, so they're either going to die or get eaten by predators more readily or they just won't be able to compete in the natural world as well."