Iranian officials visit the IAEA in Vienna for nuclear talks

IAEA chief inspector Herman Nackaerts arrives at the Iranian permanent mission to the UN on May 14, 2012 in Vienna.

Story highlights

  • Iranian officials arrive at the offices of the U.N. nuclear watchdog in Vienna
  • The meeting is about how to address Iran's nuclear program, state media say
  • Iran is under intense international pressure to rein in its nuclear program
  • It denies allegations that it is working on nuclear weapons
An Iranian delegation met with officials from the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, on Monday as diplomatic wrangling continues over Tehran's controversial nuclear program.
These are the first negotiations between Iran and the agency in three months -- the two sides held talks in Tehran in January and February, according to Iran's state-run Press TV
The aim of the current meeting is to "devise a framework for answering questions about Tehran's nuclear energy program," Press TV said in an article on its website, citing the Iranian ambassador to the IAEA, Ali Asghar Soltanieh.
In March, the IAEA noted what it called a sharp and troubling increase in Iran's uranium enrichment capabilities.
Iran denies allegations that it is working on nuclear weapons and says its program is solely directed toward developing civilian nuclear energy.
Iran's nuke program a concern for Israel
Iran's nuke program a concern for Israel

    JUST WATCHED

    Iran's nuke program a concern for Israel

MUST WATCH

Iran's nuke program a concern for Israel 04:02
Is Iran stalling in nuclear talks?
Is Iran stalling in nuclear talks?

    JUST WATCHED

    Is Iran stalling in nuclear talks?

MUST WATCH

Is Iran stalling in nuclear talks? 02:14
But Western powers and Israel say they think Iran is evading international inspections and intent on developing nuclear weapons.
This sentiment has led to sweeping sanctions targeting Iran's economy, government and its leaders.
Key world powers met with Iran last month about its intentions for its nuclear program and announced that the next meeting would take place in late May in Baghdad.
The talks involved the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council -- the United States, France, Russia, China, and Britain -- as well as Germany, referred to as the P5+1.