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Former Chinese official's son received tickets in Porsche

Bo Guagua (left) admitted he was worried about the events surrounding his family.

Story highlights

  • Former Chinese official's son denies reports that he used to drive a Ferrari
  • But Harvard student was in Porsche when he received three tickets
  • Rumors of flamboyant lifestyle have been poorly received in China
Taking on allegations that he leads a playboy lifestyle, the son of embattled former Chinese Communist leader Bo Xilai denied rumors Tuesday that he used to drive a Ferrari. But he was driving a Porsche when he received three traffic tickets over the past two years, according to an official with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation.
Bo Guagua, a graduate student at Harvard Kennedy School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, received two citations for failure to stop at a stop sign, records from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation show.
He also received a speeding ticket for going 58 mph in a 30-mph zone in February 2011.
The car he was driving when he received all three tickets was a 2011 Porsche Panamera, according to the official, who declined to be named due to the intense media coverage of the story.
"I have never driven a Ferrari," Bo said this week in a statement to the Harvard Crimson, the university's newspaper, denying a report that he picked up a date in the car in Beijing.
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In the letter, which was laid out in a series of bullet points, Bo also addressed allegations that he did poorly academically and spent much of his time partying.
The Porsche is not registered to Bo, according to the Massachusetts Department of Transportation official.
The car is instead registered to James Jun Cui, whose relationship to Bo was not immediately clear. Efforts to reach Cui were unsuccessful.
Rumors of Bo's allegedly flamboyant college lifestyle have played poorly in China, where his father, a former kingpin in the metropolis of Chongqing, promoted a revival of Maoist-style "red culture" while pursuing a widely publicized -- but brutal -- crackdown on organized crime in the city.
One family associate said there was little sympathy in China for what many regard as the typically spoiled offspring of the Communist Party elite.