Australian man charged in scheme to export U.S. military technology to Iran

Story highlights

  • David Levick has been charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States
  • He and his company are suspected of trying to export military components to Iran
  • Levick, the general manager of ICM Components, remains at large but is believed to be in Australia
An Australian man and his company have been charged in a plot to export components for drones, helicopters, torpedoes, missiles and other military technology to Iran, prosecutors said.
David Levick, 50, and his Australia-based company, ICM Components Inc., have been charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States and with violating international law, as well as four counts of illegally exporting goods to an embargoed nation, according to U.S. Attorney's Office spokesman Bill Miller.
Levick, the general manager of ICM Components, remains at large but is believed to be in Australia.
The scheme began in March 2007 and continued for two years during which time Levick allegedly ordered the components from U.S. companies on behalf of an unnamed agent who was part of an Iranian trade company.
Prosecutors say that Levick and his company at times used a broker in Florida to place orders with U.S. firms in order to conceal that they were bound for Iran.