Skip to main content

Mega-powerful camera phone, super-fast gadgets dazzle at mobile show

The FC PowerTrekk charger converts water into electricity to power a mobile. The FC PowerTrekk charger converts water into electricity to power a mobile.
HIDE CAPTION
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
nokia lumia
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Nokia unveils smartphone featuring powerful 41 Megapixel camera
  • Device among gadgets unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona
  • Other new phones include Huawei device touted as "world's fastest"

Barcelona, Spain (CNN) -- Mobile phone giant Nokia on Monday unveiled a phone with a powerful 41 Megapixel camera as it attempts to reposition itself back at the forefront of the mobile market.

The phone is among a dazzling array of new gadgets unveiled so far at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, an annual event that showcases the industry's latest innovations.

Read more: 'Must-have gadgets' at world's biggest mobile show

Among them is a Chinese phone that claims to be the world's fastest and another that carries an in-built projector.

The unrivaled camera capabilities of Nokia's 808 PureView, which runs the company's Symbian operating system, caused ripples of surprise among Congress delegates who predicted few surprises thanks to pre-event leaks and rumors.

The 41 Megapixels put the phone in the same league -- in terms of photo resolution -- as professional cameras costing thousands of dollars.

41 megapixel camera on new Nokia phone
HTC launches new phones

Reportedly priced at €450 ($600), the device is due to be released in May, with the camera technology likely to be carried over to other Nokia phones.

Nokia, which in recent years has seen its dominance of the global mobile market eroded by manufacturers such as Apple and BlackBerry, also launched a lower-cost version of its flagship Lumia phone range. The Nokia 610, priced at €189, runs on the mobile version of Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system.

On Sunday, Chinese mobile maker Huawei made headlines with what it claims is the world's fastest smartphone.

The Ascend D quad features much-vaunted quad core technology -- twice the processing power of most new devices -- and runs Ice Cream Sandwich, the latest version of the Google-linked Android operating system.

Read more: Jargon-busting mobile industry's buzzwords

It is expected to be released in China in coming months, but no dates for a roll out beyond Asia have been announced.

Other hot gadget announcements include phones by Taiwanese manufacturer HTC. Its One X, One S and One V devices feature 4.3 inch screens made of toughened Gorilla glass and eight Megapixel cameras.

Another surprise -- chiefly because the technology has proved unpopular in the past -- came in the shape of the Samsung Galaxy Beam, a phone featuring a built-in projector.

The Android-powered device allows users to beam 50-inch wide video and photo images onto walls. Industry reviewers said the gadget appeared to work well during demonstrations in a darkened room. The as yet unpriced Galaxy Beam is expected to be in shops in the next few months.

Barry Neild contributed to this story from London.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
updated 12:05 PM EST, Sun February 23, 2014
Mobile World Congress offered up robotic balls, GPS walking sticks and more than its fair share of unexpected uses for digital technology.
updated 6:34 AM EST, Thu February 28, 2013
With many smartphone users groaning about battery performance, scientists are racing to design phones that never need to be charged.
updated 8:44 AM EST, Wed February 27, 2013
Nokia's wireless charging device is a pillow for your phone so that
3D screens, flamenco dancers and endless batteries: all the latest innovations being unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.
updated 5:34 AM EST, Wed February 27, 2013
Yahoo's decision to curtail remote working has stirred dismay at a time when many companies are striving to enable telecommuting.
updated 11:30 AM EST, Tue February 26, 2013
The industry has repeatedly promised a "mobile advertising tipping point," but mobile advertising is yet to come of age.
updated 3:04 PM EST, Tue February 26, 2013
The 'phablet' seems to be MWC 2013's must-have item. This is the Asus Fonepad: A seven inch tablet with mobile phone capabilities. Samsung launched a similar product at the show called the Galaxy Note 8.0.
Didn't we tell you that the lines between smartphones and tablets are blurred? Case in point: the Asus Fonepad, a 7-inch tablet that's also a phone.
updated 12:25 PM EST, Tue February 26, 2013
In the not-too-distant future, you'll receive a full diagnosis and cure from your smartphone before you have even realized you're unwell.
updated 1:02 PM EST, Mon February 25, 2013
The next generation is just a few weeks away for the world's hottest smartphone without a piece of fruit on it.
updated 11:32 AM EST, Mon February 25, 2013
CNN's Kristie Lu Stout explores Barcelona, Spain -- home of the Mobile World Congress 2013 -- using only her smartphone.
updated 7:41 AM EST, Fri February 22, 2013
As CNN heads to Mobile World Congress 2013, we're asking readers what features they want to see on the phones of the future.
updated 11:32 AM EST, Thu February 28, 2013
Is it time to start carrying two mobile phones? At least one manufacturer is hoping more people might soon be relying on multiple mobiles.
updated 7:19 PM EST, Mon February 25, 2013
In the future we will have screens not just in the palm of our hands, but all around us, according to Google's Director of Android User Experience.
updated 9:23 AM EST, Tue February 26, 2013
Wearing spectacles that record our every move could be the end of privacy as we know it, says internet commentator Andrew Keen.
ADVERTISEMENT