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Police make 2nd arrest in videotaped beating of gay man

By the CNN Wire Staff
updated 5:34 PM EST, Fri February 17, 2012
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Dorian Moragne, 19, voluntarily turned himself in, police say
  • A third suspect remains at large
  • The videotaped beating went viral on the Internet
  • Brandon White's attackers shouted anti-gay slurs

Atlanta (CNN) -- The second of three suspects in the videotaped beating of a gay man has been arrested, Atlanta police said Friday.

Dorian Moragne, 19, voluntarily turned himself in, according to a news release. He was taken to the Fulton County Jail and is to be charged with robbery and aggravated assault.

The police said his lawyer accompanied him, but they did not release further details.

A third suspect remains at large.

The first arrest in the case came last week, when Christopher Cain, 18, was taken into custody about midnight last Friday. He was charged with aggravated assault and robbery, police said at the time.

Three men were seen in the video shouting anti-gay slurs as they beat, punched and kicked Brandon White, 20.

White was attacked February 4 outside a convenience store in a working-class neighborhood in southwest Atlanta.

He did not report the attack at first, but stepped forward after a video went viral on the Internet.

The video showed three men punching and kicking White after he stepped out of the JVC Grocery and Deli. The men, believed to be members of a gang called Jack City, yelled: "No f----ts in Jack City."

A surveillance video from the store captured eight men standing around watching, two of them with video cameras in hand. One man lunged at White with a tire in his hands.

"If a straight person can walk to the store, I should be able to do the same thing," White said. "I could have died that day. They are monsters. At this point I am beyond mad."

He said he could not at first even bring himself to watch the video; he was so humiliated.

But after its wide circulation, White decided to talk to the police.

"Once they put it out there they set themselves up," he said. "I feel I was violated. The scars run deeper than anyone will know. The physical pain, I can get over that. My thing is: Who's to say they won't come after me again? Who's to say they won't kill me?"

CNN's Vivian Kuo contributed to this report.

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