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11 Boko Haram militants killed in Nigeria

From Nima Elbagir, CNN
updated 1:10 PM EST, Sat January 28, 2012
A resident inspects a police patrol van outside Sheka police station in northern Nigerian city of Kano.
A resident inspects a police patrol van outside Sheka police station in northern Nigerian city of Kano.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • On Friday, a police station in Kano province was attacked
  • Police say the Islamist group Boko Haram was behind the attack
  • The group has been blamed for a wave of violence

Lagos, Nigeria (CNN) -- Nigerian security forces killed 11 suspected Islamic militants Saturday in the northeastern city of Maiduguri.

The militants belonging to Boko Haram died in a search operation, police said, a day after the group attacked a Mandawari police station in Kano province.

Military forces have since cordoned off the area around the provincial capital of Kano, according to witnesses. Gunfire and tracer rounds could be heard and seen during the incident.

Analysis of the increasing violence

The west African nation's inspector general of police was fired this week amid a rash of violence. In a single day this month, at least 211 people were killed in the city of Kano -- an attack linked to Boko Haram, which has carried out multiple bombings and shootings across the north.

On Thursday, gunmen shot and killed at least 16 people and burned their bodies in the northwestern state of Zamfara, according to an official who asked not to be named, citing security concerns.

CNN Photos

The incident occurred when about 100 armed men blocked a nearby highway, delaying vehicle traffic and taking hostages in the area, a restive region that borders Niger.

Some of the hostages stormed the gunmen, resulting in a deadly shootout, the official said.

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