Deputy U.S. marshal indicted in Chicago for alleged civil rights violations

Story highlights

  • The indictments stem from alleged assaults in 2010 and 2008
  • The deputy U.S. Marshal faces up to 10 years in prison for the alleged assaults
  • Conviction on related obstruction-of-justice counts could bring another 20 years
A deputy U.S. marshal was indicted Thursday in Chicago for civil rights violations in connection with two separate incidents in which he allegedly assaulted a handcuffed civilian, according to the Justice Department.
Stephen Linder, 36, was indicted by a federal grand jury for allegedly punching and choking a handcuffed man in July 2010. Linder is also accused of obstructing justice in the case by trying to persuade another official to withhold evidence of the assault.
In addition, Linder was indicted for allegedly head-butting a handcuffed man in May 2008 and with obstructing justice by allegedly persuading another officer to withhold evidence of the assault.
The indictments follow an investigation by the Justice Department's inspector general's office.
Justice Department civil rights lawyers will prosecute the case, according to the Justice Department.
If Linder is convicted, he faces up to 10 years in prison for the alleged assaults and up to 20 years for the obstruction-of-justice counts. Each count also carries a fine of up to $250,000.