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Pakistani officials: Suspected U.S. strike kills 8 at militant hideout

From Nasir Habib, CNN
Friday's suspected drone strike was the 28th this year compared with 111 in all of 2010, according to a CNN count.
Friday's suspected drone strike was the 28th this year compared with 111 in all of 2010, according to a CNN count.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Intelligence sources: The suspected U.S. drone fires three missiles in South Waziristan
  • The suspected drone strike is the 28th of the year, compared to 111 in all of 2010
  • The United States does not officially acknowledge drone attacks in Pakistan
RELATED TOPICS

Islamabad, Pakistan (CNN) -- A suspected U.S. drone strike in Pakistan's tribal region killed eight suspected militants on Friday night, intelligence officials told CNN Saturday.

Two Pakistani intelligence officials said the suspected drone fired three missiles on a militant's hideout in South Waziristan, one of the seven districts of Pakistan's volatile tribal region bordering Afghanistan.

The intelligence officials asked not to be named because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

The United States does not officially acknowledge drone attacks in Pakistan, but it is the only country operating in the region with the capacity to carry out such strikes.

Based on a count by CNN's Islamabad bureau, Friday's suspected drone strike was the 28th this year, compared to 111 in all of 2010.

Washington is seeking to improve relations with Islamabad, but is demanding specific actions from Pakistan to demonstrate its commitment to rooting out terrorists in its country.

Marc Grossman, special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan, traveled to Islamabad last month and emphasized that the U.S. needed actions, not words, according to a senior official briefed on the talks. The official was not authorized to speak on the record.

During meetings with Pakistani leaders, Grossman said the U.S. was looking for Pakistan to demonstrate a willingness to go after senior al Qaeda targets, take action against factories producing improvised explosive devices for use against U.S. troops in Afghanistan and supporting Taliban reconciliation.

During the meetings with Grossman, the senior U.S. official said, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Pervaiz Kayani voiced strong concern about the continuation of U.S. drone strikes against targets inside Pakistan, but he and other members of the

Pakistani leadership expressed a willingness to press al Qaeda, conduct joint operations and support reconciliation.

CNN's Elise Labott contributed to this report.

 
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