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Gates: U.S. forces in Japan critical to Asia security

By Yoko Wakatsuki, CNN
US Defense Secretary Robert Gates, right, answers reporters' questions during a press conference with Japanese Defense Minister Toshimi Kitazawa, left, at the Ministry of Defense in Tokyo on Friday.
US Defense Secretary Robert Gates, right, answers reporters' questions during a press conference with Japanese Defense Minister Toshimi Kitazawa, left, at the Ministry of Defense in Tokyo on Friday.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates addresses students in Tokyo
  • North Korea has grown more "lethal" and "destabilizing, he says
  • Japan, U.S. ties strained over relocation of American forces from Okinawa
  • Gates is on a visit to Asia

Tokyo (CNN) -- U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Friday that the presence of American forces in Japan is critical to meet security challenges in Asia amid the tension in the Korean Peninsula.

"To deal with this century's critical challenges, critical component will remain the forward presence of U.S. military forces in Japan," Gates said during a speech at Keio University in Tokyo. "Without such a presence, North Korea military provocations could be more outrageous or worse. China might behave more assertively toward its neighbors."

The relationship between Japan and the United States has been strained in recent years over relocation of U.S. forces from Okinawa, a southern Japanese island where most of the American forces are based.

Gates' message has been to look beyond the single thorny issue of relocation to the larger issue of security in the region.

He pointed out that North Korea has grown more "lethal" and "destabilizing." He also said China's support is necessary to defuse the tension on the Korean Peninsula.

Gates also urged Japan to take more active roles in security issues in the region.

"By showing more willingness to send self defence force abroad under international auspices consistent to your constitution, Japan is taking right places alongside with other great democracies."

Gates called China's military modernization as "opaque" and is a "source of concern to its neighbors."

He also pointed out that Chinese military in cyber and anti-satellite warfare could pose a challenge to the U.S. operation in the Pacific. The U.S. spots some "disconnect" between China's government and military, he said.

Gates, who flew from Beijing on Wednesday, left for Seoul immediately after the speech.

 
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