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FBI traveling to Peru for clues in Natalee Holloway case

From Mayra Cuevas Nazario, InSession
Natalee Holloway disappeared during a high school graduation trip to Aruba in 2005.
Natalee Holloway disappeared during a high school graduation trip to Aruba in 2005.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The FBI wants to study the laptop of Joran Van der Sloot
  • He was the last person to be seen with Natalee Holloway
  • The Alabama teen disappeared during a trip to Aruba in 2005
  • Van der Sloot is accused of killing Stephany Flores in Lima, Peru, last year

(CNN) -- FBI agents are traveling to Peru to study a laptop belonging to Joran Van der Sloot -- who was arrested twice in connection with the Natalee Holloway case, but was not charged -- according to a Lima court document.

The Alabama teen disappeared during a high school graduation trip to Aruba in 2005. Van der Sloot was the last person to be seen with Holloway.

A source close to the case told InSession the FBI will be searching for any clues that can help solve the Holloway case.

Van der Sloot also faces federal wire fraud and extortion charges in the United States, where prosecutors say he demanded more than $250,000 from Holloway's family in return for disclosing the location of her body.

The Lima court document says the unnamed FBI agents will meet March 14 with two agents of the Peruvian National Police High Technology Crime Division at the Peruvian National Police Headquarters in Lima.

During the meeting they will have access to the computer's hard drive and will be able to conduct forensic examinations on it.

Van der Sloot, a Dutch national, faces charges in another case.

He is accused of first-degree murder and robbery in the case of 21-year-old Stephany Flores. Authorities found Flores' body in a Lima hotel room registered to him in June last year.

Van der Sloot's attorney and a representative for the Flores family are expected to be present March 14.

The lawyer for Van der Sloot said Monday he has asked the court to charge his client with the lesser offense of manslaughter in Flores' death.

"In his statement to the police, Joran admitted that he committed the crime, but it was not in the way that the police said it happened," said attorney Maximo Altez. "We have submitted a motion to show that he shouldn't be charged with aggravated murder, but with violent emotion murder."

"Violent emotion murder" is the equivalent of manslaughter in the United States.

 
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