Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on

CNN Student News Transcript: April 5, 2011

Click to play
CNN Student News - 4/5/11
RELATED TOPICS

(CNN Student News) -- April 5, 2011

Download PDF maps related to today's show:

Japan
Atlanta, Georgia

Transcript

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

CARL AZUZ, CNN STUDENT NEWS ANCHOR: You're locked in for 10 minutes of commercial-free news headlines! My name is Carl Azuz, it is Tuesday, April 5th and CNN Student News is up and running.

First Up: Change in Plan

AZUZ: The Obama Administration announced yesterday afternoon, that five suspected 9/11 terrorists will get military trials at the U.S. detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Here's why that's significant: before he won the 2008 election, candidate Obama promised he'd close the prison at Guantanamo Bay. And his Justice Department said the terrorism suspects would be tried in civilian courts -- not by military tribunals. Most Americans didn't want those suspects tried in civilian courts. When Attorney General Eric Holder announced the trials at Guantanamo, he criticized Congress for restricting the Justice Department's ability to prosecute the five suspects.

Plane Investigation

AZUZ: Hundreds of flights aboard Southwest Airlines have been canceled over the past few days. It's because one of its Boeing-737 passenger jets had a problem on Friday: this. A hole measuring five feet long and one foot wide. It opened up over passengers' heads on a flight from Phoenix, Arizona to Sacramento, California. The pilots made an emergency landing in Yuma, Arizona, and no one was seriously injured. Southwest grounded 79 of its planes to check them out afterward. The model with the problem is an older one. One that's not made anymore. Southwest found indications of cracks in three other aircraft while dozens of others have been inspected and returned to the flight line.

Air France Mystery

AZUZ: It's not known exactly what caused the crash of an Air France jet two years ago, though. Flight 447 was traveling from Paris to Rio de Janiero, Brazil, when it went down in the southern Atlantic ocean. That was on June first, 2009. And until recently, large parts of the plane had not been found. On Monday, though, a French government minister said search teams located this: what's believed to be the wreckage of the Airbus 330 plane. The 228 people aboard were killed in the crash. And even if the flight data recorder is located, it's possible it won't be working anymore because of corrosion and water pressure. This area of the Atlantic typically has rough and quickly changing weather.

Japan Radiation Fears

AZUZ: This is a shot of radioactive water leaking from one of Japan's damaged nuclear reactors. It's spilling into the Pacific Ocean. Japanese workers have tried a couple different methods to stop this leak; nothing has worked yet. But because so much water has been used to prevent a nuclear meltdown, Japanese officials say they have no choice but to intentionally dump millions of gallons, into the sea. They're hoping a planned silt fence will keep radioactive material from spreading into the ocean. This is just one of the major problems caused by Japan's March 11th earthquake and tsunami -- it killed more than 12,000 people; more than 15,000 are still missing. And Kyung Lah explains how concerns about nuclear contamination are reaching far beyond Japan.

(BEGIN VIDEO)

KYUNG LAH, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: What does this toy monkey have to do with the crisis of the Fukushima nuclear plant? Nothing. But Sven Kilian is still scanning with a Geiger counter.

SVEN KILIAN, JAPANTRENDSHOP.COM: It's 0.13 microsievert.

LAH: All of his toys and gadgets at Japan trend shop.com. There's a notice on his company's home page to his international customers stating the nuclear crisis has no connection to his exports.

KILIAN: People just scared. I understand this. So we just want to prove to everybody and show you don't need to be scared.

LAH: But many are afraid. As news reports show countries like Thailand testing Japanese food exports. Hong Kong, screening passengers from Japan for radiation. In the United States, inspectors have picked up traces of radiation from the Fukushima plant on both coasts, including milk in Washington state. None have found dangerous levels of radiation but the headlines add up to a fear of products dubbed made in Japan.

Public sentiment does have a real impact on the economy. Japan watchers say in this case, it's an impact that will be felt for some time to come.

WILLIAM SAITO, ADVISOR TO JAPANESE GOVERNMENT: This is going to be a measurable impact. And some industries and some companies will not survive.

LAH: William Saito is an advisor to Japan's government on the economic fallout of the Fukushima and tsunami crises. Saito believes high-tech, nameless parts to go into vehicles and popular electronics, won't be impacted due to radiation fears. But given a choice between a brand dubbed made in Japan versus another country, consumers will not choose Japan.

SAITO: I think that consumer sentiment and going forward, things like this, once they make the decision. It's hard to change, at least for a generation. And this will affect buying habits.

LAH: Sven Kilian has this plea to global consumers.

KILIAN: Continue buying stuff. This is what helps us in Japan. It doesn't help us if everyone stops buying and panicking now, for no reason. Just makes the economy worse and doesn't help anything.

(END VIDEO)

Shoutout

CNN STUDENT NEWS: Time for the Shoutout! Which word best describes someone who currently holds an elected office? You know what to do! Is it: A) Lobbyist, B) Constituent, C) Nominee or D) Incumbent? You've got three seconds -- GO! D is the answer here -- an incumbent already holds political office. That's your answer and that's your Shoutout!

2012 Bid

AZUZ: The incumbent president is officially running for re-election. He made that announcement yesterday when filing papers with the Federal Election Commission -- something every presidential candidate, even an incumbent, must do. No Republican candidates have done that yet, though several are doing research and visiting voters nationwide. Nicole Collins explains why the president's announcement came in April, 2011 for an election that isn't 'til November, 2012.

(BEGIN VIDEO)

NICOLE COLLINS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: The 2012 presidential election begins with this.

UNKNOWN: Here it is 2012 the election.

COLLINS: A video posted on barackobama.com in which President Obama does not appear and an email from him to his supporters that reads.

"...as my administration and folks across the country fight to protect the progress we've made and make more we also need to begin mobilizing for 2012, long before the time comes for me to begin campaigning in earnest.

The president wrote that his campaign would file paperwork with the Federal Election Commission a crucial step that allows him to begin fundraising. The president's early start on his bid for re-election is a move democrats hope will allow him to reach the unprecedented fundraising goal of one billion dollars. The Republican National Committee issued its own web ad in response to the president's announcement.

UNKNOWN: We need jobs. We need leadership. Yet, you do nothing as we pile up debts we can't afford.

COLLINS: A sentiment echoed by republicans on Capitol Hill amid an ongoing, contentious budget battle.

SENATOR JOHN CORNYN, (R) TEXAS: You see the president really, you know, M-I-A., and you see him planning his announcement for his re-election bid. It's kind of like, where are your priorities? This has to be the nation's number one priority at this point, because debt is a national security problem.

COLLINS: No republicans have officially announced a bid for the white house but several have made a steady stream of appearances in key early voting states. In Washington, Nicole Collins for CNN Student News.

(END VIDEO)

Is This Legit?

CNN STUDENT NEWS: Is This Legit? Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Totally true. Martin Luther King was named "Michael Luther King Jr." when he was born in Atlanta in 1929.

Remembering Dr. King

AZUZ: And Americans gathered at several locations in Atlanta yesterday to remember the civil rights leader. It was the 43rd anniversary of the day that Dr. King was assassinated. Members of his family were scheduled to lay a wreath at his tomb in Atlanta. Other events included a ceremony hosted by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which Dr. King and his followers organized in the late 1950s. He was at a Memphis hotel when he was killed on April 4th, 1968 -- almost five years after he delivered his famous "I have a dream speech" and four years after Dr. King won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Daily Email Promo

AZUZ: You already know that CNN Student News is awesome. But know this too: You can get advance notice on what we're covering each day! It's every bit as free as our show. All you have to do is sign up for our daily e-mail at CNNStudentNews.com. Go to our home page and just scroll down to the "How Do I" box, clicking on "Sign up for the daily email."

Before We Go

AZUZ: Before we go, one word: Boater-cross! We realize this is gonna require some explanation, so here you go. Ski slope plus kayak plus pool plus hypothermia? Don't fall in; the water's not great! But the event is a Colorado ski resort's way to show the season is coming to an end with a speeding, slicing, sledding, splash-down! It's a unique way to illustrate the switch from ski season, to kayaking, biking and fishing season.

Goodbye

AZUZ: And it allows people to do a little show-boating, before they go boating -- and feature what snow kayaking is all a-boat. We're a-boat out of time, but we'll pool our resources and paddle back with a new program tomorrow. You're gonna love it! See ya then.

 
Quick Job Search