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No terrorism link found in Louisiana pipe bomb discovery

By the CNN Wire Staff
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Man's home was searched and no more pipe bombs were found, official says
  • Tony Barisich is charged with 10 counts of manufacturing and possession of a bomb
  • His truck crashed through a guard rail in an area with no residents nearby

(CNN) -- Ten homemade pipe bombs found in a pickup truck in Louisiana are not linked to terrorism, the FBI said Tuesday.

Investigators "determined there is no nexus to terrorism," FBI spokeswoman Sheila Thorne said.

The ten bombs were found in a pickup truck that wrecked on Monday morning, police said. Most were made out of PVC pipes but one was made out of galvanized piping, police said.

Officials said the pipe bombs and some fireworks were recovered from a 1998 GMC driven by Tony Ante Barisich, 53, of Terrytown, Louisiana.

"He told us he was going to use them (the explosives) for the 4th of July celebration," Louisiana State Police spokesperson Bryan Zeringue told CNN.

Barisich is charged with ten counts of manufacturing and possession of a bomb, one count of failure to have a license when manufacturing an explosive, one count of improper storage of explosives, and one count of reckless handling of explosives, Zeringue said.

Barisich, a boat captain, is being treated for injuries at Thibodaux Regional Medical Center in Thibodaux, Louisiana, and awaiting transfer to LaFourche Parish, Zeringue said.

After the accident, authorities had Barisich airlifted to the hospital, where they interviewed him.

His home was searched, and no additional pipe bombs were discovered, a law enforcement official said.

In the accident Monday, Barisich lost control and crashed the pickup through a bridge guard rail and "into a rural cane field with a bayou on one side and no residents close by," Zeringue said.

The car flipped into a drainage ditch at around 8:30 a.m., police said.

Agents from the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives also took part in the investigation.

CNNs Carol Cratty, Dave Alsup and Rick Martin contributed to this report.

 
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