Skip to main content

Boston mayor wants Nike shirts out of window

By Marina Landis, CNN
Boston Mayor Thomas Menino asked Nike to remove these T-shirts from the window of their store.
Boston Mayor Thomas Menino asked Nike to remove these T-shirts from the window of their store.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Sports tops combine pictures of pill bottles with slogans
  • Mayor says, "There's a fine line between edgy and stupid"
  • Nike says it doesn't condone use of illegal things
RELATED TOPICS
  • Boston
  • Nike Inc.
  • Tom Menino

New York (CNN) -- Nike has refused to remove a storefront of T-shirts in Boston despite demands by Mayor Thomas Menino, who said it encouraged illegal drug use.

The shirts are part of the Nike 6.0 brand campaign geared towards what Nike calls "the new generation of action sports athletes who are changing the worlds of surf, snow, ski, BMX, wake and moto."

In a letter to the general manager of Niketown Boston, Menino wrote, "Your window display of T-shirts with drug and profanity wordplay are out of keeping with the character of Boston's Back Bay, our entire city, and our aspirations for our young people." He added, "T-shirts that combine 'Just Do It,' 'Get High' with pictures of pill bottles are a more than unfortunate twist on your corporate slogan, and I urge you to remove them."

In a statement to CNN, Nike said: "These t-shirts are part of an action sports campaign, featuring marquee athletes using commonly used and accepted expressions for performance at the highest level of their sport, be it surfing, skateboarding or BMX. Nike does not condone the use of banned or illegal substances."

Menino told affiliate WCVB, "There's a fine line between edgy and stupid; they put their sneakers on and ran right over that. The public has to react also; the public should probably say, we're not going to buy their sneakers."

As of Wednesday evening, the T-shirts were still up in the window display and Nike had no further comment on whether it plans to remove them in the future.

CNN's Leigh Remizowski contributed to this report.

 
Quick Job Search