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'Spider-Man' actor leaves rehab after fall

By Jordana Ossad, CNN
Injured actor Christopher Tierney says he looks forward to returning to a Broadway production of "Spider-Man."
Injured actor Christopher Tierney says he looks forward to returning to a Broadway production of "Spider-Man."
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Christopher Tierney, 31, has been released from a rehabilitation center in New York
  • Tierney said he is looking forward to returning and is not concerned about his safety
  • The actor suffered several broken bones and a bruised lung in the fall
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New York (CNN) -- A Broadway actor who fell more than 20 feet during an aerial stunt in the musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," has been released from a rehabilitation center in New York, a show spokesman said.

Christopher Tierney, 31, was released from New York University's Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine on Wednesday morning, according to spokesperson Sam Corbett.

Tierney was moved into the institute after being discharged from Bellevue Hospital on December 28.

He suffered four broken ribs, a hairline skull fracture, a broken scapula, or shoulder blade; a bruised lung, three cracked vertebrae and broken bones below his elbow as a result of his fall, his father said.

"He is up," Tim Tierney said. "He is walking and just doing very well." He noted that his son is looking forward to returning to the show.

Several of the performances were canceled following the December 20 incident, as new safety measures were put in place following a meeting with officials from the Department of Labor and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Tierney said Tuesday that he is looking forward to returning to the show and is not concerned about his own safety.

"I'm not worried about it," he said. "They've got it well taken care of."

Another actor in the show, Patrick Page, said the new measures have increased communication between actors and safety personnel.

The show, with music and lyrics by U2's Bono and The Edge, is said to be the most expensive in Broadway history.

But the behind-the-scenes drama at the $65 million production -- including a series of mishaps resulting in actor injuries -- has continued to raise questions over its safety record.

 
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