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ICC to probe reports banned Amir played village match in England

Mohammad Amir was banned from all cricket for five years by the International Cricket Council in February.
Mohammad Amir was banned from all cricket for five years by the International Cricket Council in February.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • ICC to investigate reports Mohammad Amir took part in a village game in England
  • Amir is serving a five-year ban from cricket after being found guilty of corruption
  • The 19-year-old Pakistani says he thought the match did not contravene his ban
  • Matt Prior reprimanded by ICC for smashing a window at Lord's cricket ground

(CNN) -- Banned Pakistani cricketer Mohammad Amir could face more disciplinary action from the sport's governing body amid reports he took part in a village match in England.

The 19-year-old fast bowler was forbidden from taking part in all forms of cricket for five years in February after being found guilty of deliberately bowling no balls in the spot-fixing scandal that engulfed Pakistan's series with England last year.

Amir insisted that he was told his appearance for Surrey village side Addington 1743 would not violate his ban because it was a friendly match.

But the International Cricket Council have confirmed to CNN that they will be investigating the incident and could mete out further punishment.

Colin Gibson, the ICC's Head of Media and Communications, said, "We are investigating and awaiting the details. If true, it is clearly a breach of the sanction imposed in February.

"The ban is absolutely worldwide covering all levels and any activities connected with cricket. What might happen next is a hypothetical question at this stage."

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British newspaper The Daily Star reported Wednesday that Amir played in the game against St Luke's and took four wickets before scoring 60 runs with the bat. He is said to have left before the end of the match.

Two of Amir's teammates, former Pakistan captain Salman Butt and bowler Mohammad Asif were also banned by the ICC, for ten and seven years respectively, for their part in the gambling ring.

Quotes from Amir appeared on Pakistani cricket web site PakPassion.net on which he is reported to have said: "I was informed by club representatives before the game that it was a friendly match, being played on a privately owned cricket ground.

"I asked the club representatives if the match fell under the jurisdiction of the ECB (England and Wales Cricket Board) and they informed me that the match did not.

"I spoke to several club representatives about the issue, and they all told me that it was a friendly match and therefore would not contravene my ban from the ICC. I would not be stupid enough to knowingly play in a match that I knew would contravene my ban.

"Wherever I am going to play cricket, the world will know about it. I would not be stupid enough to play in a match where I knew that I would be taking a risk."

The ban is absolutely worldwide covering all levels and any activities connected with cricket
--Colin Gibson, ICC spokesman

Meanwhile, the ICC confirmed England wicketkeeper Matt Prior has been "reprimanded" for smashing a window at Lord's after being run out during the second Test match with Sri Lanka.

Prior was angry at being dismissed and hurled his bat down in the dressing room, causing another bat to smash the window, shattering glass on several spectators and allegedly cutting the ankle of a member of the crowd.

Prior apologized immediately, and the ICC acknowledged that the incident was "purely accidental and without malice," though they could still fine the player up to 50 percent of his match fee.

England team director Andy Flower saw the incident and told the ECB's official web site: "There was no real malicious intent at all. He was a little frustrated and shoved his bat in the corner, and it knocked around and bounced off one or two other bats and hit the pane of glass.

"It was a freak accident but definitely an accident. It is a shame that people will think anything other than that. It is not a major incident by any stretch of the imagination, and everybody should put it behind them really.

"If there was more to it, then of course it should be taken further. But there really is not."