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Review: The Lonely Island's new album "Turtleneck & Chain"

By Andy Greenwald, EW.com
The Lonely Island's latest album "Turtleneck & Chains" is a perfectly acceptibad follow-up from "Incredibad."
The Lonely Island's latest album "Turtleneck & Chains" is a perfectly acceptibad follow-up from "Incredibad."
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The group is Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer
  • On ''Motherlover,'' Justin Timberlake returns for a deeply filthy, proudly MILF-y ode
  • Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, Snoop Dogg, and Michael Bolton all make appearances
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(EW.com) -- Truly, ''D--- in a Box'' is the gift that keeps on giving for the Lonely Island, the nom de fake rap of "Saturday Night Live" star Andy Samberg and his BFFs, "SNL" writer-directors Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer.

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Since that brilliant, indisputably instructive R&B satire first appeared in 2006, the trio -- along with featured players like Rihanna, T-Pain, and a very game Justin Timberlake -- has had remarkable success in the notoriously difficult genre of ''funny music,'' hitting a neat balance of parody and sweet-natured homage (peppered with plenty of references to their respective junk).

Now, two years after "Incredibad," a debut that collected many of the group's greatest, previously televised hits, comes "Turtleneck & Chain,"
a perfectly acceptibad follow-up.

EW.com: 'SNL' skit men The Lonely Island reveal new album cover, guests Justin Timberlake, Rihanna, Nicki Minaj and more

On ''Motherlover,'' honorary Islander Timberlake returns for a deeply filthy, proudly MILF-y ode to ''pushing that way where you came out as a baby,'' while the triumphantly goofy ''I Just Had Sex,'' with Akon, manages to be both outrageous and entirely plausible radio bait.

EW.com: Michael Bolton returns to 'SNL' after 20 years: Best thing he did in between appearances?

Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, a sleepy, maybe-not-in-on-the-joke Snoop Dogg, and ''major cinephile'' Michael Bolton(!) all make appearances -- but it's the chameleonic core trio that truly surprises. At one point, over a classic, adrenalized hip-hop beat, Samberg and Taccone trade fierce criminology rhymes with a swagger that's downright serious.

Until, of course, one notices the title: ''Trouble on Dookie Island.''

See the original article at EW.com.

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