Sandusky denies new child-abuse allegations, attorney says

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Story highlights

  • Two new accusations of child abuse stem from "a very nasty" divorce, lawyer says
  • Jerry Sandusky denies inappropriate contact with relatives, attorney says
  • Sources: Two new cases were reported to authorities less than 60 days ago
  • The alleged victims are currently under 18, the sources say
Former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky denied Wednesday two new allegations of child abuse that authorities are investigating, his attorney said.
"Jerry has adamantly denied the allegations," said attorney Joseph Amendola, adding that the accusations appear to be part of "a very nasty divorce and custody battle."
The investigations were opened by Children and Youth Services in Pennsylvania, sources close to the investigation said Tuesday. In Pennsylvania, cases of alleged child abuse reported by an alleged victim who is an adult are strictly police matters, even if the alleged offenses occurred when that person was a child.
Children and Youth Services participates in the investigation only if the alleged victim is still under 18.
Said Amendola: "I know at least one Children's Youth Services investigation has been opened up by Centre County CYS regarding Jerry's alleged abuse of one of his (family members). We don't know for sure. The allegations are ridiculous and unfounded.
"Jerry has absolutely denied any inappropriate contact with his (family members). It's important to keep in mind these allegations were made after the attorney general filed charges against Jerry even though the alleged incident(s) took place before the AG's charges were filed," Amendola told CNN.
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The attorney said he and Sandusky haven't been told of the nature of the alleged abuse by the attorney general or the family member who made the allegations.
"Even if you buy into the attorney general's allegations against Jerry -- which we vehemently dispute and which we intend to vigorously defend against -- these new allegations don't fit the profile presented by the AG. These new allegations appear to be the result of a very nasty divorce and custody battle," Amendola said.
If the allegations are found to be credible, they would be the first known cases involving current minors to become public since Sandusky's arrest. All the other publicly known cases have involved alleged victims who are now adults.
The new cases were reported less than 60 days ago, according to sources close to the investigation.
Sandusky was arrested on November 5 after the release of a grand jury report detailing crimes that he is accused of committing between 1994 and 2009. He is free on $100,000 bail, and he has denied the allegations.
Based on the grand jury report, Pennsylvania's attorney general has charged Sandusky with 40 counts in what authorities allege was the sexual abuse of eight boys.
In addition, Penn State Athletic Director Tim Curley and Gary Schultz, a university vice president, resigned their posts after being charged with failing to inform police of the allegations. Head football coach Joe Paterno and President Graham Spanier also lost their jobs in the wake of the report, when questions were raised about the university's response.
According to grand jury documents, a graduate assistant told Paterno in 2002 that he had seen Sandusky performing anal sex on a young boy in a football complex shower. Paterno informed Curley, who told Schultz, according to the grand jury report.