Strauss-Kahn demands to be questioned over alleged prostitution ring

Story highlights

  • Dominique Strauss-Kahn has again asked to be questioned by authorities
  • Investigators are leading an inquiry into an alleged French prostitution ring
  • The ex-IMF chief has not been charged in connection with the probe
  • Five people have been arrested in connection with the investigation
Dominique Strauss-Kahn has again asked to be questioned by authorities leading an inquiry into an alleged French prostitution ring, after media reports have tied him to the case.
His attorneys released a statement Friday saying the former director of the International Monetary Fund wants to address the so-called "media lynching" that he says falsely links him to sex parties with prostitutes in Europe and the United States.
The ex-IMF chief has not been charged in connection with the probe.
"A true media lynching has continued to grow, fueled by information carefully selected from documents communicated to the press," the statement said.
It called the allegations "unhealthy, sensationalist, and not without a political agenda."
Strauss-Kahn, once considered a leading French presidential candidate, said he "is ready to explain himself, not before the uncertain court of public opinion but before those who are leading the judicial inquiry."
He said he wants to be heard "as soon as possible," after first asking to be questioned last month, according to the statement.
The current investigation kicked off in October and centered around the northern French city of Lille, where investigators began looking into claims that luxury hotels served as a base for a high-profile prostitution network.
A hotel manager in Lille was arrested shortly thereafter on suspicion of arranging prostitutes for guests. Since then, four other men have also been arrested in connection with the scandal.
It is not clear if they have since been charged, and the men could not immediately be reached for comment.
French media, including France's weekly Journal du Dimanche and the country's left-wing newspaper Liberation, later linked Strauss-Khan to the scandal.
Journal du Dimanche reported last month that investigators believe the former IMF head may have used the prostitution services.
CNN cannot independently verify that account and Strauss-Kahn has denied the allegations.
The former finance minister, meanwhile, has sought to recast his public image following a series of separate scandals that spanned both France and the United States.
He stepped down from the top job at the IMF after a New York hotel maid in May accused him of sexual assault and attempted rape. The case ultimately fell apart after the alleged victim posed significant credibility issues for prosecutors, despite forensic evidence that showed a sexual encounter had occurred.
In France, he later faced allegations of attempted rape from a young French writer.
Tristane Banon filed a complaint, alleging a 2003 attack, though it could not be pursued because of a statute of limitations. Strauss-Kahn denied the allegations in both cases and has since filed a countersuit in France alleging slander.