Secret Service officer's gun discharges near Russian consulate

Story highlights

  • The uniformed officer was in a patrol car when the gun was fired
  • The firearm went off accidentally, the Secret Service says
  • Uniformed Secret Service officers provide security to embassies, among others
A uniformed officer of the U.S. Secret Service accidentally discharged his firearm early Wednesday while sitting in a patrol car near the Russian consulate in Washington, an agency spokesman said.
No one was injured in the incident.
The incident occurred around 4 a.m. in the 2600 block of Tunlaw Road in northwest Washington, said spokesman James Mackin.
Mackin declined to give the exact circumstances of the shooting, saying it is under investigation. Officers were scouring the area at daylight looking for the round.
Nor would he give the assignment of the officer, except to say that he was assigned to the Foreign Missions Branch of the Secret Service. That branch provides security to the embassies and consulates of countries that give reciprocal protection to U.S. missions overseas.
The U.S. Secret Service declined to identify the officer involved in the incident, or give his years of service. Mackin said the officer notified his superior officer in accordance with protocol, and the supervisor notified the Secret Service's Office of Professional Responsibility, which serves as the agency's internal affairs investigator.
In addition to the Secret Service's well-known plainclothes division, which protects the president, vice president and a limited number of others, the Secret Service has 1,400 uniformed officers who provide protection to the White House, the vice president's mansion, embassies and consulates.