Occupy movement fights foreclosures, protests program cuts

The Occupy Wall Street movement, which started in New York in September, has spread across major cities worldwide.

Story highlights

  • Lawyers representing Occupy Arizona announce a lawsuit intended to stop arrests
  • Senior citizens and disabled demonstrators join the movement in Chicago
  • Fresno protesters stage a "good, old-fashioned sit-in," the sheriff says
  • A couple who met at Occupy Philadelphia tie the knot

What started as the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York in September has spread across major cities worldwide as a call to action against unequal distribution of wealth.

Here is a roundup of some of the movement's recent developments.

ATLANTA

Up to 20 protesters in Atlanta moved to the suburbs Monday, taking up position in a home with a family of five facing foreclosure. Members of Occupy Atlanta will stay in Snellville for 48 hours, according to a group spokesman.

Protesters plan to canvass the neighborhood with the family to drum up support to help occupy other homes facing foreclosure, said Tim Franzen.

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Jesse Jackson supports Occupy movement
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CHICAGO

White hair and wheelchairs dotted the crowd in Chicago Monday, as senior citizens and disabled demonstrators joined the Occupy movement to protest cuts in safety net programs.

"At every level of society, Americans are under attack," said protester Karen Bocker. "When the economy tanks, social programs are cut, not corporate tax breaks."

Some 1,500 members of the Jane Addams Senior Caucus hit the streets with Occupy Chicago, according to a statement from the group. More than 40 protesters linked arms in a downtown intersection, blocking traffic -- some of them sitting on the pavement -- to protest threats to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

Police issued citations to 43 people, who will be required to pay a fine, said Chicago police spokesman Veejay Zala. The demonstrations were peaceful, and there were no reports of injuries, he said.

FRESNO, CALIFORNIA

Police arrested at least 22 people during the weekend in Fresno, California, in connection to the Occupy Fresno protests, according to demonstrators and the city's sheriff. An additional protester was taken into custody Monday, according to the Occupy Fresno website.

Demonstrators agreed to "voluntary arrest" as a form of protest, said Sheriff Margaret Mims, and did not resist. "They staged a good, old-fashioned sit-in," she said.

Protesters arrested Sunday were released the same day, according to a post on Occupy Fresno's website.

PHILADELPHIA

A couple that met a month ago, working the information booth at Occupy Philadelphia, married Monday.

Alicia "Ally" Nauss of Philadelphia and Adam Hill of Norristown, Pennsylvania, took their vows at the group's encampment at Dilworth Plaza next to City Hall, CNN affiliate WPVI reported.

"We work really well together. When you meet somebody like that ... it felt completely natural," Nauss said.

The couple said they'll spend their honeymoon visiting other Occupy movements along the East Coast.

Protesters face a possible showdown with the city over the site of their demonstration. The plaza has been scheduled for a $50 million renovation, scheduled to begin this month. There have been negotiations between the city and the demonstrators over alternative sites.

TUCSON, ARIZONA

Beset by rain and cold, Occupy protesters in Tucson, Arizona, solicited material donations online Monday to help winterize their camp, while lawyers representing the group announced a lawsuit intended to stop arrests.

Occupy campers asked the public for waterproof tarps, warm and dry outerwear, sleeping bags, blankets and better tents in an entry on their blog. They included a request for delivery to their location.

Also Monday, volunteer attorneys calling themselves the Occupy Tucson Legal Working Group said that they have filed a civil rights suit in federal court, "and will ask for a temporary restraining order to stop arrests at Veinte De Agosto Park," where protesters are camped out.

The lawyers said they represent 96 local Occupy protesters, who have more than 400 misdemeanor charges against them.