Occupy Portland: We aren't responsible for vandalism

Story highlights

  • "The Real Occupy Portland" says it did not vandalize banks
  • An earlier e-mail said the group claimed responsibility
  • Police say the two vandalism incidents are under investigation
A group calling itself "The Real Occupy Portland and the 99%" told police in Portland, Oregon, it was not responsible for vandalizing two banks, despite an earlier apparent claim of responsibility.
At 8:34 a.m. Saturday, Portland police responded to a Chase Bank branch, where windows had been broken and paint thrown inside the building, police said in a statement. Nearly two hours later, a Wells Fargo branch reported its windows had been broken.
Late Saturday, an e-mail was forwarded to Portland police from CNN affiliate KGW, which received it.
"A small part of the 99% decided to strike back at some of the institutions that we hold responsible for the creation of a violent and inequitable world," said the e-mail signed by "The Real Occupy Portland."
The vandalism was in "solidarity" with Bank Transfer day, a social media-driven campaign urging consumers to withdraw their money from banks in favor of credit unions, said the e-mail, which was released by police.
But on Sunday, police said they received a second e-mail from the group "The Real Occupy Portland and the 99%." That e-mail said the group is a non-profit that was established five days ago.
"We are currently not affiliated with any other group in the city, and are still in the process of organizing the structure," according to the e-mail, which was also released by police.
"The purpose of our organization is to support the non-violent Occupy Movement across the country. 'The Real Occupy Portland' is not connected with these acts of violence and does not condone any vandalism or violence," the e-mail said.
The group said it understood from media reports that the previous communication was sent from an anonymous address.
Both incidents were under investigation, the Portland Police Bureau said in a statement. Police will communicate with representatives of Occupy Portland to address public safety concerns, authorities said.