Cameroonian president wins vote, extending 29-year-rule

Cameroon's freshly-elected President Paul Biya waves to supporters on the campaign trail earlier this month.

Story highlights

  • Court: President Paul Biya got 77% of the vote to beat 22 others
  • The 78-year-old has led the west African nation since 1982
  • Opposition candidates have urged citizens to protest over alleged fraud
Cameroon declared the incumbent leader winner of this month's presidential election, extending his nearly three decades in office by seven more years.
President Paul Biya got 77% of the vote to beat 22 other contenders, the nation's Supreme Court said.
Security forces were dispatched to the court Friday during the announcement of the results.
The interim leader's supporters burst into jubilant chants outside the court as opposition supporters carried banners in protest.
The 78-year-old has led the west African nation since 1982. His new seven-year term means he will be at the helm into his mid-80s.
John Fru Ndi, the leader of Cameroon's largest opposition party, was declared runner-up with 10% of the vote.
Other contenders followed with minimal wins.
Opposition candidates have urged citizens to protest over alleged election fraud, with a dozen contenders signing petitions calling for the ballot's annulment.
They allege Biya resorted to massive fraud to extend his nearly 29-year rule.
The election was held on October 9.