A new morning in Libya after Gadhafi's death

Libyans listen to the Friday prayer sermon in Tripoli's Martyrs Square on October 21, one day after Moammar Gadhafi's death.

Story highlights

  • At one mosque in Tripoli, imam gives thanks for dictator's downfall
  • But one man said Moammar Gadhafi died in an 'un-Islamic way'
  • Some Libyans still celebrating with smaller festivities.
  • Not everyone welcomed Gadhafi's death
For the first time in more than 40 years, dawn in Libya rose on Friday without the dictator and his shadow.
Libyans awoke to empty Friday streets, typical for the holy day of the Muslim week, and engaged in somber reflection about Moammar Gadhafi's life and death. That solemnity followed a wave of unbridled joy Thursday as people exulted over the news of Gadhafi's death and fired their guns in celebration.
After Friday prayers at the Salahaddin Mosque in Tripoli, worshippers said their imam had given thanks during his sermon for Gadhafi's downfall.
"Today is a special day at the mosque," said Sala Mersal after prayers. "Since 42 years, we cannot say anything. ... Nobody could say anything inside the mosque. Today it is free, and anybody can say anything they want."
Gadhafi's body in Misrata cooler
Gadhafi's body in Misrata cooler

    JUST WATCHED

    Gadhafi's body in Misrata cooler

MUST WATCH

Gadhafi's body in Misrata cooler 00:35
NTC: Gadhafi's death 'unintentional'
NTC: Gadhafi's death 'unintentional'

    JUST WATCHED

    NTC: Gadhafi's death 'unintentional'

MUST WATCH

NTC: Gadhafi's death 'unintentional' 01:10
Gadhafi's burial delayed
Gadhafi's burial delayed

    JUST WATCHED

    Gadhafi's burial delayed

MUST WATCH

Gadhafi's burial delayed 02:45
A small crowd gathered outside the mosque, with bullet casings littering the streets, and chanted "God is great" and "One, two, three ... Libya is free!"
Amid the smiles and victory signs, Hisham Boaishi conceded that he did not approve of the "un-Islamic way" that Gadhafi was killed.
"We would have liked to take him to court and have his judgment," said Boaishi, 33, an information technology specialist who sported a long beard. "But not this way. We are Muslims; we don't support this way."
Not all residents of Tripoli welcomed Gadhafi's bloody death.
One young man, who asked not to be identified for fear of reprisal from anti-Gadhafi forces, said he was "ashamed" at the way the former dictator died. He said his mother cried in front of the television Thursday night upon seeing images of the bleeding leader.
"He should have been taken to court," the man said.
"I'm not ashamed. I'm proud that we captured him ... no matter how many soldiers he hired," said Mohamed Saya, a member of the media committee for Libya's new governing National Transitional Council.
The next chapter in the Arab Spring
The next chapter in the Arab Spring

    JUST WATCHED

    The next chapter in the Arab Spring

MUST WATCH

The next chapter in the Arab Spring 03:52
Libyans celebrate in front of White House
Libyans celebrate in front of White House

    JUST WATCHED

    Libyans celebrate in front of White House

MUST WATCH

Libyans celebrate in front of White House 00:54
The last moments of Moammar Gadhafi
The last moments of Moammar Gadhafi

    JUST WATCHED

    The last moments of Moammar Gadhafi

MUST WATCH

The last moments of Moammar Gadhafi 01:12
NTC officials insist shortly after his capture by rebel forces, the ousted leader was killed in a crossfire between pro- and anti-Gadhafi fighters.
With Gadhafi dead, Saya said Libya's de facto government was preparing to hold a "Liberation Day" celebration in the eastern city of Benghazi this weekend. Benghazi was the launching point of Libya's uprising in February.
In the meantime, some Libyans continued to hold their own smaller festivities.
On one Tripoli street, fighters and residents gathered beneath the tri-color banner of Libya's anti-Gadhafi flag next to a camel they planned to slaughter in honor of the dictator's death.