Prosecutor asks for charges against France's Jacques Chirac to be dropped

Former French President Jacques Chirac arrives at his office, September 1.

Story highlights

  • Chirac was accused of embezzling funds from the city of Paris while mayor
  • Nine others were accused of corruption
  • The judge has yet to deliver a verdict in the case
  • Chirac has always denied wrongdoing while mayor
A Paris prosecutor has asked for corruption charges against former President Jacques Chirac to be dropped, courthouse press representative Sylvie Polack confirmed Tuesday.
Chirac was accused of misuse of public funds when he was mayor of Paris, from 1977 to 1995, before he became president.
The prosecutor also asked for nine other people charged along with Chirac to be acquitted Tuesday. The judge has yet to give his verdict in the case and could still find the accused guilty.
Chirac, now 78, had immunity from prosecution during the 12 years he was president of France, from 1995 to 2007.
He was accused -- along with the other defendants -- of using public money to pay people to work for his political party, the RPR, and to pay others to perform jobs that did not really exist.
"There are elements missing to show both the intentional and material aspect of an offense, so I ask that the charges be dropped against the 10 defendants," said Michel Maes, an aide to the prosecutor.
The judge's verdict is expected before the end of the year, the courthouse press representative said.
Former French Prime Minister Alain Juppe was sentenced in December 2004 for his role in the affair.
After Chirac left office as president, he made it known he was available to answer any questions on the matter. He always denied wrongdoing.