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This week on Marketplace Middle East

CEO, Ki-Seok Park, on Samsung's potential in the Middle East and why South Korea is pushing aggressively in the region.
CEO, Ki-Seok Park, on Samsung's potential in the Middle East and why South Korea is pushing aggressively in the region.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • This week, the UAE government begins a process called "Emiratization"
  • Its goal is to motivate locals to work, by creating jobs and training opportunities
  • Plus, Ki-Seok Park, Samsung Engineering's CEO on South Korea's potential in the region

(CNN) -- In focus -- 'Emiratization'

The UAE, like the rest of the Gulf, doesn't have a large indigenous labour force.

Expats make up majority of the workforce. So, the government began a process called "Emiratization."

In theory, its goal is to motivate locals to work, by creating jobs and training opportunities. But the UAE, like many of its neighbours, is a cash-rich nation. Citizens are entitled to a number of benefits, and few need to work.

So, how does the government create skilled local workforce? And why are women stepping up to drive the change?

Facetime with Ki-Seok Park, CEO, Samsung Engineering

Traditionally, European, American and Japanese contractors have dominated the construction business in the Middle East. Now a new competitor is on the horizon -- South Korea.

Samsung Engineering, founded in 1970, was the first engineering company in South Korea. Over the next three years, it expects 80 percent of its revenues to come from the MENA region.

This week MME sits down with the CEO, Ki-Seok Park about the potential in the Middle East and why South Korea is pushing so aggressively in the region.

Watch the show this week at the times below:

• Fridays 0915, 1945
• Saturdays 0715
• Sundays 0115, 545, 0815 (all times GMT)