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Greece resumes air shipments after bombings

By the CNN Wire Staff
Police investigators search  the scene of the controlled explosion outside of the ACS courier offices in Athens, Nov. 4, 2010.
Police investigators search the scene of the controlled explosion outside of the ACS courier offices in Athens, Nov. 4, 2010.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Police have discovered 14 parcel bombs this week
  • All were addressed to foreign targets, and one person was wounded
  • Two men have been arrested in the case

Athens, Greece (CNN) -- Greece has resumed air delivery of packages outside the country after a 48-hour suspension, a spokesman for the prime minister's office said Friday.

The country imposed the suspension amid a wave of attempted bombings against international targets this week.

Police have discovered 14 parcel bombs emanating from Greece, most of which were sent to various embassies in Athens. Police intercepted and destroyed most of them in controlled explosions, but a woman at a courier office was wounded by one of the devices and another exploded in the courtyard of the Swiss Embassy.

Other parcel bombs were addressed to European targets including the leaders of Germany and Italy.

Multiple letter bombs found in Greece
More terror threats in Greece
Greek bombs deemed 'homegrown'
RELATED TOPICS
  • Greece

Two men accused of participating in the bombings were remanded into custody Thursday. They were arrested in Athens on Monday in possession of two parcel bombs, Glock pistols, a bulletproof vest, and a wig.

Panagiotis Argyrou, 22, and Gerasimos Tsakalos, 24 were also in possession of a delivery slip for another parcel containing an explosive device which had been delivered to a courier service and was addressed to the Dutch Embassy, police said.

Hellenic Police spokesman Maj. Athanasios Kokkalakis called the two suspects "important members of a terrorist group."

Before this week's attacks, Argyrou already faced an arrest warrant for his alleged membership in an illegal organization called the Conspiracy of the Cells of Fire.

Greek authorities have stressed that they believe the wave of letter bombs is the work of a home-grown Greek terrorist group that does not have ties to international organizations like al Qaeda.

CNN's Ivan Watson and journalist Elinda Labropoulou contributed to this report.