Skip to main content

Officials: Pakistan flood deaths top 1,100

By the CNN Wire Staff
Click to play
Pakistan flooding kills hundreds
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Areas along the Indus River would be badly affected
  • Flooding also reported in Pakistani-controlled Kashmir
  • Officials: Thousands of acres of crops, government buildings, businesses, washed away
  • The United States has committed $10 million for flood relief

Islamabad, Pakistan (CNN) -- The devastating floods in Pakistan have killed more 1,100 people, Pakistani government officials told CNN on Sunday.

Another 30,000 people were stuck on their rooftops and in higher areas as they tried to escape rushing floodwaters, a United Nations official said Sunday.

"We've got the government sending boats and helicopters to try to reach people and bring them to safety at the same time as trying to deliver emergency relief," said Nicki Bennett, a senior humanitarian affairs officer for the U.N.

Damaged roads and bridges have made rescuing stranded residents difficult, she said, noting that even a U.N. warehouse where the organization stores food, blankets, soaps and bucks is partially underwater.

"As we are trying to reach people, we have to battle with the ongoing access problems," she said.

The rescue and recovery efforts of the Pakistan flooding could become more complicated as weather officials predict more monsoon rains starting Monday.

The Pakistan Meteorological Department said Sindh, Punjab, Kashmir, eastern parts of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and eastern parts of Balochistan would receive monsoon rains. Areas along the Indus River would be badly affected due to extremely high flood conditions.

Video: Flooding challenges aid efforts
Video: 1 million affected by floods
As we are trying to reach people, we have to battle with the ongoing access problems
--Nicki Bennett, United Nations humanitarian affairs officer
RELATED TOPICS
  • Pakistan
  • Floods
  • Natural Disasters

The number reflects those killed only in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, previously known as the North West Frontier Province, said spokesman Mian Iftikhar Hussain.

Flooding has also been reported in Pakistani-controlled Kashmir. Twenty-five deaths were recorded there Friday, Hussain said.

A Pakistani Red Crescent official told CNN that the number of people affected by the floods has risen to nearly 2.5 million people, with infrastructure receiving major damage.

Rushing water also has washed away thousands of acres of crops, government buildings, businesses, schools, bridges and homes, officials said.

The United States will assist in relief efforts by bringing in 50,000 meals, rescue boats and helicopters, 12 pre-fabricated steel bridges and water filtration units, the embassy in Islamabad said.

According to Geo TV, 150 people are missing in a northwestern province, and 3,700 homes were swept away. Forty-seven bridges in Swat have been destroyed or damaged.

Geo TV also said 3,000 are in a camp in Nowshera and are without enough water and food. Displaced residents are unhappy with the government response, Geo TV said. Trains have also been delayed, frustrating commuters.

"They have made this a joke," a commuter told the network. "There are young children here, but there is no water, nor is there any seating. They have taken our ticket money. Yet after every few minutes they change the train timings. They are playing a game of lies and deceit."

Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik visited Khyber Pakhtunkhwa on Saturday and found tourists and local residents trapped because of the heavy floods, the state-run Associated Press of Pakistan reported.

President Asif Ali Zardari said all available resources would be used to help those stranded by the waters, the APP reported.

Many of the victims died when flood waters swept away hundreds of mud houses in parts of Swat Valley and the districts of Shangla and Tank, according to Bashir Ahmed Bilour, a provincial minister in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Hussain said flooding has cut off the Swat Valley and the districts of Shangla and Peshawar. There is no way to get to these areas by road, he said.

The Pakistani Air Force has been helping with rescue efforts, spokesman Tariq Yazdanie said in an interview on Pakistani TV. The recent torrential rains have broken all previous records of rainfall in the country, he said.

The United Nations said there is a need for help in providing emergency shelter, food, drinking water and sanitation facilities. Its agencies are geared to help with these issues.

The European Commission is providing 30 million euros ($39 million) to help the people affected by the flooding.

U.S. Embassy officials in Pakistan said the United States has committed $10 million to support flood relief priorities, four inflatable rescue boats, two water filtration units that can fulfill the daily water requirements of up to 10,000 people, and 12 pre-fabricated steel bridges to temporarily replace damaged bridges.

U.S. officials have also provided more than 51,000 halal meals (military rations tailored for people of Islamic faith) and another 62,000 will arrive Sunday.

In addition, the U.S. provided helicopters to support the Ministry of Interior's rescue operations.

The same weather system is also responsible for flooding in bordering Afghanistan, where 65 people have died, and 61 were injured since Thursday, according to Abdul Matin Adrak, head of disaster management for Afghanistan.

The flooding started Thursday and continued for more than six hours. Rescue teams were able to access all the flooded villages using ministry of defense helicopters. Food and equipment was donated and transferred to the affected people by ISAF and Afghan Security forces.

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Greg "Boomer" Roberts, adviser to the Afghan Air Force, told CNN Sunday morning that the Afghan air force rescued about 2,000 villagers who were stranded. Roberts accompanied the air force during their rescue mission in the Kunar province -- a known insurgent stronghold.

"They knew they could accomplish their mission. When we came into the area and the Taliban made their presence known, they continued ... and picked up 2,000 people who were definitely overcome by the floods. And they did it right there in full view of the Taliban.

"There's not a doubt in my mind that some of the folks we picked up are Taliban," he said, adding that most were probably looking for employment with the organization.

He said the rescue mission is the type of move that could sway people away from the Taliban and toward the Afghan government.

CNN's Miranda Leitsinger, Reza Sayah, Nazneen Akbari, Matiullah Mati, and Barbara Starr contributed to this report.

Part of complete coverage on
Impact Your World
Be part of the solution. Get informed, connect to organizations and share how you have made an impact
Pakistan flooding
Weeks after flooding first displaced millions of people in Pakistan, the crisis is far from over
Gulf Coast oil disaster
The cleanup efforts for the largest oil disaster in U.S. history could continue for years
Celebrity spotlight
America Ferrera from TV's "Ugly Betty" builds school in Mali
 
Quick Job Search