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Paraguayan president doing fine after blood clot treatment

By the CNN Wire Staff
Fernando Lugo, president of Paraguay,  is a former Roman Catholic bishop. His five-year term is to end in August 2013.
Fernando Lugo, president of Paraguay, is a former Roman Catholic bishop. His five-year term is to end in August 2013.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • He was transferred to hospital in Brazil after having redness, swelling around his face
  • Fernando Lugo had a blood clot, his doctor says
  • The president was diagnosed in August with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
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(CNN) -- Paraguay's cancer-stricken president is "lucid, "perfectly fine" and will not require surgery at this point, his doctor said Sunday.

President Fernando Lugo is currently undergoing treatment at the Syrian-Lebanese Hospital in San Paolo, Brazil. His doctor, Alfredo Boccia, said the president had a blood clot, which is not an uncommon side effect of chemotherapy.

"The clot has broken up in an important way. This is extremely positive and takes the president out of the risky situation that he was in," Boccia said in a statement.

He added Lugo will not require surgery at this point and that he is "perfectly fine, lucid, and without problems and pain."

Paraguay's president was diagnosed in August with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer affecting the immune system. It was detected at an early stage.

Lugo is a former Roman Catholic bishop. His five-year term is slated to end in August 2013.

He was admitted to a hospital in Paraguay's capital Thursday, and later transferred to the hospital in Brazil to avoid possible complications, said Boccia. Lugo, 59, was suffering from redness and swelling around the face. Doctors initially were concerned the president might have had an infection.

According to the American Cancer Society, non Hodgkin's lymphoma is one of the most common caners in the United States, according for about 4 percent of all cancers.