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At least six people kidnapped in Mexico hotel raid

By the CNN Wire Staff
Police in Mexico are investigating the kidnappings of at least six people from a hotel in Monterrey, Mexico.
Police in Mexico are investigating the kidnappings of at least six people from a hotel in Monterrey, Mexico.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • About 30 gunmen stormed into the Holiday Inn at around 2 a.m.
  • Man in handcuffs told gunmen which rooms to go to
  • A businessman from Mexico City was among those kidnapped
  • Same gunmen reportedly entered a second hotel
RELATED TOPICS
  • Mexico
  • Kidnapping
  • Monterrey

(CNN) -- Mexican authorities on Thursday continued to investigate the kidnappings of at least six people from a Holiday Inn in Monterrey, Mexico, Wednesday.

Nuevo Leon state Attorney General Alejandro Garza y Garza said in a news conference that the unidentified gunmen entered a second hotel as well, the state-run Notimex news agency reported.

A convoy of between 10 and 15 vehicles carrying as many as 30 gunmen pulled into the Holiday Inn at around 2 a.m., Garza y Garza said.

According to him, the gunmen brought a handcuffed man into the lobby, who gave them information on the intended victims.

A businessman from Mexico City, Luis Miguel Gonzalez, was kidnapped, along with three other guests, Garza y Garza said.

The other guests were identified as Angel Ernesto Montes de Oca of Mexico City, Manuel Juarez and Aracely Hernandez, an employee of a staffing company near the border with the United States.

A hotel receptionist, David Salas, was also kidnapped, together with another hotel employee, authorities said.

A security guard at the hotel was missing, but it was not confirmed that he too was kidnapped, Garza y Garza said.

Before leaving, the gunmen took the computer from the reception desk as well as the video from the security camera, he said.

Minutes later, there was a report of the same group of gunmen entering the Mision Hotel, located near the Holiday Inn. Police responded to the hotel, but the officials there declined to report a crime to the authorities.

Northern Mexico, particularly the states of Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon, have seen a recent uptick in violent activity, much of it blamed on warring drug cartels.

 
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