Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on

South African police crack down on protesters, illegal ticket holders

By the CNN Wire Staff
Protesters demonstrate against the firing of security staff at the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.
Protesters demonstrate against the firing of security staff at the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Police break up protest by striking World Cup security with stun grenades and rubber bullets
  • 12 protesters arrested for illegal gathering and inciting violence
  • In court dedicated to World Cup-related offenses, man sentenced to 3 years for possessing stolen property -- 30 tickets

Johannesburg, South Africa (CNN) -- Police used stun grenades and rubber bullets to break up a protest by striking World Cup security guards in a Cape Town suburb Thursday, said National South African Police spokesman Vish Naidoo.

He said the crowd was very rough and refused to leave when asked to disperse. Twelve protesters were arrested for illegal gathering and inciting violence, said Naidoo.

The FIFA World Cup Organizing Committee and the South African Police Service agreed Tuesday that police would replace the striking private security at four stadiums for the duration of the World Cup, officials said.

In addition, South Africa has set up a court dedicated to offenses related to the World Cup.

On Wednesday night, a magistrate in that court sentenced a Nigerian national to three years in prison for unlawfully possessing 30 tickets to World Cup matches, according to a statement from South Africa's National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure (NATJOINTS).

Video: World Cup justice in South Africa
RELATED TOPICS

The magistrate convicted Kunle Benjamin on a charge of possessing stolen property after police discovered the tickets were purchased over the Internet and he couldn't give a satisfactory explanation as to how he got them, said NATJOINTS.

Benjamin had been arrested Sunday in Pretoria after he was allegedly driving erratically and police discovered the tickets on him.

CNN's Nkepile Mabuse contributed to this report.

Part of complete coverage on
Psychic octopus to retire
Paul the octopus, who correctly predicted the outcome of eight World Cup matches in a row, is retiring from the forecasting business.
CNN's Twitter Buzz
Who's tweeting about what? Follow the World Cup trends and all the latest action from South Africa.
Are you passionate enough?
Are you a fanatical supporter of your national football team? Do you like to shout about your opinions? Become a CNN Super Fan!
Results and Standings
Check out all the scores, group tables and fixtures
CNN teams up with Foursquare
Let your friends know where you're watching the World Cup, and earn CNN badges while you're having fun.