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Kenya deports Jamaican-born Muslim cleric

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Kenyan anti-terror police picked up Abdullah Ibrahim el-Faisal days after he passed into country unnoticed
  • El-Faisal sentenced in London to 9 years in prison in March 2003 for inciting others to commit murder
  • He was paroled in 2007 after serving half his sentence and deported to Jamaica, according to reports
RELATED TOPICS
  • Kenya
  • Jamaica
  • Islam

Nairobi, Kenya (CNN) -- Kenya has deported a Jamaican-born Muslim cleric who was previously jailed in Britain for inciting racial hatred, the Kenyan immigration minister said Thursday.

Abdullah Ibrahim el-Faisal was deported to the West African country of Gambia, Kenyan Immigration Minister Otieno Kajwang told reporters in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi.

Kenyan anti-terror police picked up Abdullah Ibrahim el-Faisal days ago after he passed into the country unnoticed, police spokesman Eric Kiraithe told CNN on Tuesday.

Kenya's immigration minister declared him an unwanted person in Kenya, Kiraithe said, adding that el-Faisal is a threat to Kenya's security with "proven" terrorism links.

El-Faisal was sentenced in London to nine years in prison in March 2003 for inciting others to commit murder and for stirring racial hatred. He had been arrested a year earlier.

He was paroled in 2007 after serving half his sentence and deported to Jamaica, according to British news reports.

El-Faisal entered Kenya from Tanzania, Kiraithe said, but it was not clear when.

Kiraithe acknowledged there had been "lapses" between Kenya's police and immigration that allowed the cleric to enter the country.

Kenyan Muslim groups have protested the moves to deport el-Faisal.

"He is being treated unfairly," said Al-Amin Kimathi, the executive coordinator for the Muslim Forum of Human Rights, "He has committed no crimes in Jamaica and has not committed any crimes in Kenya. There is a double standard at work."

Before his sentence in Britain, el-Faisal had spent much of the previous decade preaching in various mosques and selling audiotapes across the country.

In one of the tapes, he said, "How do you fight the Hindus? You have to bomb the Indian businesses. And as for the Jews, you kill them physically. Then you will overcome them in Kashmir and in Palestine."

His lawyers in Britain had asked the judge in his case to consider the Muslim convert "misguided rather than malicious."

The defense stressed that most of his preachings were benign interpretations of the Quran. They also said el-Faisal, a husband and father who had been living in the east London neighborhood of Stratford, had been a leader in his community.

CNN's David McKenzie contributed to this report.