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Times Square suspect to appear in court

By the CNN Wire Staff
Faisal Shahzad faces five counts in connection with the botched bombing attempt.
Faisal Shahzad faces five counts in connection with the botched bombing attempt.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Times Square suspect faces five counts in connection with botch bombing attempt
  • Faisal Shahzad planned to detonate explosives in Times Square, authorities say
  • Pakistani-American scheduled to appear Tuesday, faces life in prison if convicted
  • U.S. intelligence believes the Pakistani Taliban is planning attacks on American interests

New York (CNN) -- The man accused of trying to set off a bomb in New York's Times Square is scheduled to appear in federal court Tuesday.

Faisal Shahzad, a 30-year-old Pakistani-American, faces five counts in connection with the botched vehicle bomb attempt in Times Square on May 1.

He could be sentenced to life in prison if convicted.

He is scheduled to appear in federal court at 10 a.m. ET for a preliminary hearing.

Dressed in a gray sweatsuit and free of handcuffs, Shahzad appeared before a federal magistrate May 18 to hear the charges against him.

His lawyer did not object to a judge's order that he remain in federal custody.

Shahzad did not enter a plea.

Senior counterterrorism officials said Shahzad also pondered attacks on Rockefeller Center, Grand Central Terminal and the World Financial Center in New York City, going so far as to case some of the targets. He also considered attacking Connecticut helicopter manufacturer Sikorsky, officials said.

Shahzad's arrest heightened concerns about the Pakistani Taliban, which authorities believe directed the Times Square plot.

U.S. intelligence officials fear the Taliban are actively plotting to strike within the United States and are targeting American interests overseas.

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The concerns about the group are coming from multiple sources, including from Shahzad, the officials said.

Three men were picked up in connection to Shahzad during a sweep in the Northeast.

They are accused of being involved in an informal money-transfer network that provided cash to Shahzad.

Pakistan has rounded up another 11 people for questioning, though no one has been charged.