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Los Angeles approves Arizona business boycott

By Alan Duke, CNN
City council member Ed Reyes gives a thumbs up to supporters after the resolution was approved.
City council member Ed Reyes gives a thumbs up to supporters after the resolution was approved.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Los Angeles City Council approves boycott of Arizona-based businesses and governments
  • Several other California cities have already adopted similar resolutions
  • Resolution says immigration law "encourages racial profiling and violates Fourteenth Amendment"
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(CNN) -- The Los Angeles City Council overwhelmingly approved a boycott of Arizona-based businesses and governments Wednesday unless the state repeals a new law giving police the power to question a detainee's immigration status.

Several other California cities, including San Francisco and Oakland, have already adopted resolutions requesting city departments to not sign any new contracts with Arizona companies.

The Arizona law requires immigrants to carry their registration documents at all times and allows police to question individuals' immigration status in the process of enforcing any other law or ordinance.

The Los Angeles resolution passed Wednesday said Arizona's new immigration law "encourages racial profiling and violates Fourteenth Amendment guarantees of due process and equal protection for U.S. citizens, legal residents and visitors who are detained for suspicion of being in the country unlawfully."

The city's legislative analyst reported that Los Angeles currently has $56 million in contracts with companies headquartered in Arizona.

The city's Harbor Department, which has $26 million of such contracts, is opposing the resolution, the report said. This includes money for the "Clean Truck Program," it said.

"The Harbor does not recommend rescinding this incentive program due to adverse effects this action would have on the environment and public health," the analyst wrote.

The resolution also prohibits city employees from traveling to Arizona "unless special circumstances can be demonstrated" that canceling a trip would "harm city interests."

The National Council of La Raza announced a boycott last week against Arizona's $18.6 billion tourism industry because of the new law, and called on other groups to join. Nearly 30 organizations have come on board, including the Rev. Al Sharpton's National Action Network, People for the American Way, the Japanese American Citizens League and the Service Employees International Union.

Critics of the law say it will lead to racial profiling, while supporters say it involves no racial profiling and is needed to crack down on increasing crime involving illegal immigrants.