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The New York Times bans use of word 'tweet'

"Tweet" will no longer appear in the The New York Times, says the paper's standards editor.
"Tweet" will no longer appear in the The New York Times, says the paper's standards editor.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The New York Times says "tweet" isn't standard English
  • Someday, " 'tweet' may be as common as 'e-mail,' " Corbett says
  • Not everyone uses Twitter and therefore may not know what a "tweet" is, he says
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(CNN) -- To anyone who uses Twitter, the word "tweet" is as natural as, well, a bird. But don't expect to see it in The New York Times.

"Someday, 'tweet' may be as common as 'e-mail,' " wrote Phil Corbett, the Times' standards editor, in a memo this week, according to The Awl. But, for now, Corbett has nixed further use of the word -- "outside of ornithological contexts," he wrote.

The Times will stop using the word because "tweet" isn't standard English, "and standard English is what we should use in news articles," Corbett said.

Corbett noted that not everyone uses the micro-blogging site and therefore may not be familiar with what a "tweet" is.

After all, The New York Times always uses words people are familiar with, like "louche" and "shibboleths."

So what will The New York Times be calling these Twitter updates now?

" 'Tweet' may be acceptable occasionally for special effect," Corbett said in the memo.

"But let's look for deft, English alternatives: use Twitter, post to or on Twitter, write on Twitter, a Twitter message, a Twitter update. Or, once you've established that Twitter is the medium, simply use 'say' or 'write.' "

[TECH: NEWSPULSE]

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