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Gamers get a look at 'Halo: Reach' at Comic-Con

"Halo: Reach," celebrated at the Comic-Con International show in San Diego, California, is due out in September.
"Halo: Reach," celebrated at the Comic-Con International show in San Diego, California, is due out in September.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Developers promote "Halo: Reach," due out September 14, at Comic-Con International
  • Bungie debuts Forge World, its in-game object editor, at Comic-Con
  • Bungie's Brian Jarrard: "It was inspired by and built for our fans"
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San Diego, California (CNN) -- Comic-Con International makes headlines mostly as a showcase for Hollywood's latest offerings, but video game companies know how to make an impression at the show as well.

Bungie, the makers of the hugely popular "Halo" series, held a party to promote "Halo: Reach," due out September 14.

Partygoers, including cast members from the popular web series "The Guild," played "Halo" and other games. "Halo: Reach" will be the last "Halo" game developed by Bungie, the original "Halo" developer, and company executives said they hope to go out with a bang.

Their big announcement at last week's Comic-Con? The debut of Forge World, a software tool that players can use to design levels, maps and virtual realms within the game.

"It's really a hard-core, fan-based tool," said Brian Jarrard, Bungie's community director. "It was inspired by and built for our fans. Forge World is a really enormous, expansive environment. We give people about 150 types of building blocks, and ramps and towers and bunkers to go in and build their own multiplayer spaces."

The latest in the first-person shooter sci-fi series, "Halo: Reach" will be set in 2552 and will pit a supersoldier against an alien collective. Bungie released a beta version of "Halo: Reach" in May and used input from players to tweak the final version of the game.

"We got a ton of feedback from that," Jarrard said. "We made some significant changes to the game that we probably would not have made otherwise."

So how does Comic-Con compare with Electronic Entertainment Expo, better known as E3, the annual video gaming conference that wrapped last month in Los Angeles?

"Here, it's more genuine," Jarrard said. "It's nice to be able to talk to real fans who play our game."

[TECH: NEWSPULSE]

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