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Injury forces Moya to hang up racket

Mallorca-born Carlos Moya will play a farewell tournament in Seville next month, having called time on his professional career.
Mallorca-born Carlos Moya will play a farewell tournament in Seville next month, having called time on his professional career.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Former world No. 1 Carlos Moya calls time on his tennis career due to injury problems
  • The 34-year-old Spaniard has not played since losing at the Madrid Open in May
  • He won 20 titles in 15 years on the ATP Tour, including the 1998 French Open
  • Moya was the first player from his country to top the men's world rankings

(CNN) -- He was the first Spanish player to reach the top of the tennis world rankings, but now Carlos Moya is contemplating life away from the sport that he has played at the top level for the past 15 years.

The 34-year-old has been unable to overcome a foot problem, with his last match on the ATP Tour circuit being a first-round defeat at the Madrid Open in May.

"I wanted to play the big tournaments and say goodbye, but I got to the Madrid tournament and I still wasn't 100 percent. I am still young for life, but for sport I am already knocking on a bit," he told reporters at a press conference.

"I realized with that match that the moment had arrived. It's not how I dreamed of ending my career."

I have a sports business and I'll dedicate more time to my family. But I'll definitely miss tennis
--Carlos Moya
RELATED TOPICS
  • Carlos Moya
  • French Open
  • Davis Cup
  • ATP Tour Inc.
  • Tennis

Moya won the French Open in 1998 before taking the top men's spot in March the following year, holding it for just two weeks as he became the first Spaniard at the summit since the introduction of the rankings system in 1973.

Born on the island of Majorca but now resident in Switzerland, he has earned more than $13 million in prize money since his debut in 1995.

Moya has slumped to 519th in the world, but can look back to better days when he won 20 titles on the main circuit, lost in the final of the 1997 Australian Open and reached the semis of the 1998 U.S. Open.

That year he also reached the title match of the season-ending ATP World Tour Finals, losing to compatriot Alex Corretja.

In 2004, alongside a youthful Rafael Nadal -- the current No. 1 -- Moya helped Spain to win the Davis Cup for the second time as he was victorious in both his singles matches against the United States

Moya -- who plays right-handed despite being a natural lefty -- will bow out in a farewell tournament in Seville next month, according to the ATP Tour website, then look to a life outside tennis.

"I'll keep on with my gym in Majorca. I have a sports business and I'll dedicate more time to my wife, my daughter and my family. But I'll definitely miss tennis," said Moya, whose baby Carla arrived in August.