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Your chance to quiz tennis legend Pat Cash

Send your questions in for Australian tennis legend Pat Cash.
Send your questions in for Australian tennis legend Pat Cash.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Your chance to quiz 1987 Wimbledon champion Pat Cash
  • Cash is famed for his climb into the stands to greet his loved ones after winning Wimbledon
  • The Aussie now hosts CNN's monthly tennis show Open Court
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London, England (CNN) -- It is one of the most iconic moments in tennis history. A young Pat Cash clambers into the stands at Wimbledon to greet his loved ones after winning the men's singles title.

Plenty of players have followed in his footsteps since, snaking their way up to greet their family and friends above the famous SW19 scoreboard, but Cash was the first.

And now thanks to CNN, you can put your questions to one of the most recognizable faces in the game.

Why not quiz him on why he decided to embark on the 'Cash dash' or the feeling of winning Wimbledon -- the only major he managed to win during his 15-year career?

Home hopes distant at U.S. Open

Or maybe you'd like his take on the modern game. Is Roger Federer's crown slipping?

Can Rafael Nadal dominate tennis like the Fed Express did before him? When will Andy Murray win a major?

And what does he think of state of the women's game ?

All you have to do is leave your question at the foot of the page and Cash will reveal all on Friday's 1530 GMT edition of World Sport.

Cash turned professional in 1982 and the following year, at just 18, became the youngest player to participate in the Davis Cup final, winning the decisive rubber to secure the title for Australia.

At the U.S. Open in 1984, Cash lost in the semifinal to Ivan Lendl after a five-set thriller, on the same day as an epic women's final between Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova.

With John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors also contesting another five-set classic, it is regarded as one of the greatest days in tennis history and became known as 'Super Saturday.'

Cash also made the final of the Australian Open in 1987 but lost to Stefan Edberg in a five-setter, but his moment of destiny was to come at Wimbledon later that year.

He knocked out Mats Wilander and Connors en route to the final, where he beat Czech Lendl to seal his first grand slam title, and give birth to that famed celebration.

Cash was forced to retire in 1997 through injury but still occasionally turns out on the Champions Tour, as well as commentating on several tournaments throughout the year.