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Motorsport mourns death of Walkinshaw

Walkinshaw was a familiar face in the Formula One pit lane over recent years.
Walkinshaw was a familiar face in the Formula One pit lane over recent years.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The world of motorsport is mourning the death of Scotsman Tom Walkinshaw
  • Walkinshaw is one of the men who introduced Michael Schumacher to Formula One
  • The 64-year-old had success at Benetton and later owned Ligier and a stake in Arrows
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(CNN) -- The world of motorsport is mourning the death of Tom Walkinshaw, one of the men credited with introducing Michael Schumacher to Formula One.

The 64-year-old Scotsman, who was also a key administrative figure in his other sporting love rugby, lost his long battle with cancer over the weekend.

In his younger days, Walkinshaw competed in Formula Two and Touring Cars disciplines before retiring and setting up his own team -- Tom Walkinshaw Racing (TWR) -- in the late 1970s.

After his TWR cars twice won the prestigious Le Mans 24-hour race, Walkinshaw moved into Formula One in 1991 as engineering director with the Benetton team.

One of his first decisions was to bring Ross Brawn to the team, and the pair were responsible for recruiting Schumacher, who won the first of his seven world titles with Benetton in 1994.

As well as his success with Benetton, Walkinshaw also took charge of the Ligier team and later owned a controlling share in the Arrows marque.

Financial problems eventually resulted in both Arrows and TWR folding in 2002, but Walkinshaw continued to stay in motorsport, running a team in V8 Supercars in Australia.