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Blatter: No damage to England 2018 World Cup bid

FIFA president Sepp Blatter says British newspaper allegations have done no harm to England's 2018 World Cup bid.
FIFA president Sepp Blatter says British newspaper allegations have done no harm to England's 2018 World Cup bid.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Sepp Blatter says corruption scandal has not damaged England's 2018 World Cup bid
  • Sunday Times investigation uncovered allegations of bribery among FIFA execs
  • Two executive committee members were banned from FIFA after the story
  • Vote to decide hosts of 2018 and 2022 competitions takes place on 2 December

(CNN) -- FIFA president Sepp Blatter believes England's bid to host the 2018 World Cup has not been harmed by allegations of corruption that resulted in the suspension of two executive committee members on Thursday.

Amos Adamu of Nigeria and Reynald Temarri of Tahiti were banned by football's world governing body after British newspaper The Sunday Times claimed they had asked for money in exchange for their votes.

Four other officials from the organization were also suspended after an investigation by its ethics committee, but some FIFA members were angered by the newspaper's conduct.

Speaking at a press conference at FIFA's headquarters in Switzerland, Blatter said the scandal would not affect England's chances ahead of the December 2 vote to decide who hosts the 2018 and 2022 tournaments.

"Why should this have an influence on the English bid?" the 74-year-old told reporters in Zurich.

I don't think they [the executive committee] will take into consideration what has been published or not
--Sepp Blatter, FIFA president
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"Human beings taking decisions don't look so much at the documents in front of them so I don't think they [the executive committee] will take into consideration what has been published or not."

Blatter acknowledged the situation had given FIFA the chance to clean-up football but added that he thought the way The Sunday Times had conducted their investigation was "not fair".

"No, I'm not pleased about that because this is not very fair but now we have a result it gives us an opportunity to clean a little bit whatever has to be cleaned," he said.

"But I cannot say that it is very fair when you open traps to entrap people. But if the objective is to have a clean sheet in football then I can understand it."

However, Blatter denied that there was a wider corruption problem in football and said those who had been suspended by the association were the exception rather than the rule in a sport he described as a "family of 300 million people."

"In this case there are six people that have been found guilty -- six out of 300 million does not mean that the whole of football is corrupt."