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Rookie spinner small Beer, says Australian selector

Michael Beer could make his Test debut for Australia against England in Perth.
Michael Beer could make his Test debut for Australia against England in Perth.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • West Australian selector delivers withering verdict on rookie spinner Michael Beer
  • Beer has been drafted into Australia's squad for the third Ashes Test with England
  • West Australian left-arm spinner only made his first class debut two months ago
  • England lead the five-match series 1-0 after thrashing Australia in Adelaide

(CNN) -- Rookie spinner Michael Beer has been labeled a "panic selection" by one of the men who played a part in his rise into Australia's Ashes squad to face England.

West Australian selector Darryl Foster, who was part of the panel that elected to give Beer his first class debut for Western Australia eight weeks ago, was less than glowing when he described the spinner as an "OK" bowler.

Beer has been drafted into Australia's squad for the third Test with England at the WACA in Perth, as the country try to bounce back from a crushing defeat in the second Test.

England took a 1-0 lead in the five-match series at Adelaide, winning by an innings and 71 runs -- Australia's worst defeat on home soil since 1993.

But Foster is dubious as to whether the uncapped Beer, who is poised to become the tenth spinner used at Test level since Shane Warne retired in 2007, can improve the Australian attack.

"I do think it's a panic decision," he told Wisden Cricketer magazine. "I don't know why they are determined to play a spinner. Once upon a time they would have played four quicks at the WACA and left it at that."

He seems to be a reasonably good competitor. Whether he's class enough for that level, time will tell
--West Australian selector Darryl Foster on Michael Beer
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Beer has been selected to replace fellow left-arm spinner Xavier Doherty, who was punished by England's batsman during the first two Tests, taking just three wickets at a cost of 306 runs.

But though Foster thinks Beer is "slightly better" than Doherty, he says he still has reservations about his competence at Test level.

"He seems to be a reasonably good competitor. Whether he's class enough for that level, time will tell," Foster said. "Doherty wasn't up to that task and I don't know that any left-arm spinner here would be up to it.

"I think Beer is slightly better, he's taller than Doherty, his action is good, he does get some drop and a bit of flight and he's turned the ball on the WACA, which is surprising."

Meanwhile, England pace bowler James Anderson insists he is fresh and raring to go after a flying visit to England for the birth of his second child.

Anderson, who took six wickets in Adelaide, left for England as soon as the match finished and arrived back in Australia on Monday.

But he told the England and Wales Cricket Board's website: "I didn't try to acclimatize back to English conditions, just tried to stay on Australian time.

"I didn't get into a sleep routine in England. I think I've done that well. I had a good night's sleep last night. I feel fresh, and probably happy for the rest from bowling after a tough first two Tests."