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ICC reject fixing claims during England-Pakistan one-day match

Pakistan cricketers celebrate their win over England in the one-day game alleged to have involved match fixing.
Pakistan cricketers celebrate their win over England in the one-day game alleged to have involved match fixing.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • International Cricket Council drop investigation into claims a one-day match was 'fixed'
  • ICC say there is no "compelling evidence" England v Pakistan game was tainted
  • Pakistan won the 50-over match at The Oval in London on September 17
  • ICC paves the way for a Test world championship starting in 2013

(CNN) -- The International Cricket Council has pointed to a lack of "compelling evidence" to support match-fixing claims relating to a one-day match between England and Pakistan in September.

British newspaper The Sun claimed it had proof that bookmakers knew details of scoring patterns in Pakistan's innings before the match at The Oval in London began.

That allegation prompted the chairman of the Pakistan Cricket Board, Ijaz Butt, to claim there was talk in bookmakers circles that England's players had been paid "enormous amounts of money" to lose the match.

Butt later withdrew his comments after the England team threatened to take legal action against him.

Now the ICC's anti-corruption and security unit (ACSU) has dropped its investigation into the match, saying there isn't strong enough evidence.

A statement on the ICC's official website read: "The ACSU has verified all the available information and concluded that there was no compelling evidence to suspect individual players or support staff.

"The investigation is now complete but if new and corroborating evidence comes to light then clearly the ACSU will re-open the matter."

The future of our great sport depends on the public maintaining their confidence in the games they are watching
-- Sharad Pawar, ICC President
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The ICC said they would not comment on the case featuring three Pakistan players -- Salman Butt, Mohammad Amir and Mohammad Asif -- who are currently suspended after claims of spot-fixing during the Test series with England, but they did maintain their determination to clean up the game.

ICC President Sharad Pawar said: "We have stressed that we will not tolerate any form of corruption in cricket and that we will work tirelessly to root out those who have acted in a way which brings cricket into disrepute.

"The future of our great sport depends on the public maintaining their confidence in the games they are watching. We owe it to every player, administrator, every cricket lover to win this battle against a very small minority who may wish to corrupt this game."

The ICC also said its Pakistan Task Team will work with the PCB to "carry out any reforms which may be deemed necessary to restore confidence in the administration of the game in Pakistan."

The ICC also confirmed their intention to pave the way for a world Test championship starting in 2013. It would mean a playoff between the top four ranked Test teams every four years.

"We have agreed in principle to exciting and far-reaching proposals to tackle this most important issue," said ICC chief executive Haroon Lorgat.

"The proposals, especially introducing more meaningful context, means we now have the potential to follow international cricket that is even more exciting."