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Pakistani cricketers donate win bonuses to flood relief

Pakistan cricketer Umar Akmal celebrates beating England at the Oval. Half the team's win bonus was donated to flood relief.
Pakistan cricketer Umar Akmal celebrates beating England at the Oval. Half the team's win bonus was donated to flood relief.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Pakistan cricket team donate $54,400, half of their win bonus, to flood relief victims
  • Pakistan trail England 2-1 with one Test to play in their series with the host nation
  • Pakistan's one day captain and top umpire raise extra funds through seseparateampaigns
  • UN says it needs $200 million worth of aid.

(CNN) -- Pakistan's cricket team have donated half their win bonuses to help the relief victims of a flood in their home nation.

Having beaten England by four wickets in the third Test at the Oval last week -- leaving Pakistan 2-1 behind in the series with one Test left to play -- the nation's top cricketers offered $54,400 in a bid to help their stricken countrymen.

The contribution to the flood relief effort, which was announced by the Pakistan Cricket Board, is the latest in a number of fund-raising efforts aimed at helping those who have been affected by the disaster in recent weeks.

"The PCB chairman has announced a winning bonus ... and all the players and officials have donated half of the bonus in flood-relief funds," the PCB said in a statement.

This latest act of charity by the national cricket team comes just one week after it was announced that PCB officials, staff and national team players had donated $137,590 to the same cause.

All the players and officials have donated half of the bonus in flood-relief funds
--The Pakistan Cricket Board
RELATED TOPICS
  • Pakistan
  • Floods
  • Cricket

Shahid Afridi, Pakistan's one-day captain, and the country's leading umpire Aleem Dar have also run separate campaigns for flood relief, raising millions of rupees.

The PCB have also revealed that they are planning a game against Zimbabwe to raise further funds for the flood victims. This would be the first international cricket that has taken place in Pakistan since March 2009, following the terror attacks on the touring Sri Lanka side.

In recent weeks, the worst floods in the country's history have killed 1600 people and left 20 million without homes in the north-west and southern regions of Pakistan.

The U.N. says it still needs $200 million more in aid. Pakistan play England in the final Test in the series at Lords on Friday.