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Police: Colorado Rockies president died of natural causes

By the CNN Wire Staff
Rockies President Keli McGregor, shown here in 2007, had no drugs in his system; his death wasn't suspicious, police said.
Rockies President Keli McGregor, shown here in 2007, had no drugs in his system; his death wasn't suspicious, police said.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Keli McGregor was found unconscious in Salt Lake City hotel room
  • Baseball club owner died of natural causes, police say
  • There were no drugs in his system and the scene was not suspicious, police say
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(CNN) -- Colorado Rockies President Keli McGregor, who was found dead in April in a Salt Lake City, Utah, hotel room, died of natural causes, police said Thursday.

The Utah state medical examiner office forwarded the autopsy and toxicology results earlier this week to Salt Lake City Police.

McGregor, 48, had no drugs in his system and the scene of his death was not suspect, said police Sgt. Robin Snyder.

Police would not disclose Thursday precisely what killed the club official. Police have maintained since April that they did not suspect foul play in the death of McGregor, who had no previous history of known medical problems. The case is now closed, police said.

Police received a call shortly before 9 a.m. on April 20 that a man had been found unconscious in a room at the Grand America Hotel, an upscale hotel near downtown Salt Lake City. Medics tried unsuccessfully to revive him. McGregor was in the city for a business trip with team Chairman and CEO Charlie Monfort, and Greg Feasel, the team's executive vice president.

McGregor had been the National League baseball team's president since October 18, 2001, according to a biography posted on the team's website. His online biography said McGregor and his wife lived in Golden, Colorado, and have four children.